Budapest (Hungary)

Budapest is the capital of Hungary. As the largest city of Hungary, it serves as the country’s principal political, cultural, commercial, industrial, and transportation cente and is considered an important hub in Central Europe.

In 2008, Budapest had 1,702,297 inhabitants, down from a mid-1980s peak of 2.1 million.

The Budapest Commuter Area (or Greater Budapest) is home to 3,271,110 people.The city covers an area of 525 square kilometres (202.7 sq mi) within the city limits. Budapest became a single city occupying both banks of the river Danube with a unification on 17 November 1873 of right-bank Buda and Óbuda with left-bank Pest.

Aquincum, originally a Celtic settlement, was the direct ancestor of Budapest, becoming the Roman capital of Lower Pannonia.

Magyars arrived in the territory in the 9th century. Their first settlement was pillaged by the Mongols in 1241-42. The re-established town became one of the centers of Renaissance humanist culture in the 15th century.

Following the Battle of Mohács and nearly 150 years of Ottoman rule, development of the region entered a new age of prosperity in the 18th and 19th centuries, and Budapest became an alpha world city after the 1873 unification.

It also became the second capital of Austria-Hungary, a great power that dissolved in 1918. Budapest was the focal point of the Hungarian Revolution of 1848, the Hungarian Soviet Republic of 1919, Operation Panzerfaust in 1944, the Battle of Budapest of 1945, and the Revolution of 1956.

Widely regarded as one of the most beautiful cities in Europe, its extensive World Heritage Site includes the banks of the Danube, the Buda Castle Quarter, Andrássy Avenue, Heroes’ Square and the Millennium Underground Railway, the second oldest in Europe.

Other highlights include a total of 80 geothermal springs, the world’s largest thermal water cave system, second largest synagogue, and third largest Parliament building. The collections of the Natural History Museum and the Museum of Fine Arts are also significant.

The city ranked 3rd (out of 65 cities) on Mastercard’s Emerging Markets Index (2008), and ranked as the most livable Central/Eastern European city on EIU’s quality of life index (2009).

It attracts over 20 million visitors a year. The headquarters of the European Institute of Innovation and Technology (EIT) and the first foreign office of the CIPA will be in Budapest.

Source: Wikipedia

Inside of train, at Budapest Metro (old subway)

Inside of train, at Budapest Metro (old subway)

"Churches" room from House of Terror (1st floor)

"Churches" room from House of Terror (1st floor)

"Everyday Life" room from the same floor

"Everyday Life" room from the same floor

"Gulag" room from the second floor

"Gulag" room from the second floor

"The Fifties" room from the same floor

"The Fifties" room from the same floor

T-54/55 Russian tank from groundfloor

T-54/55 Russian tank from groundfloor

At the entrance (fascism vs communism)

At the entrance (fascism vs communism)

On the Széchenyi Chain Bridge, over Danube

On the Széchenyi Chain Bridge, over Danube

The funnicular from down

The funnicular from down

The funnicular from up

The funnicular from up

The Danube viewed from the Castle Hill

The Danube viewed from the Castle Hill

Hungarian lash, for their masochist tradition

Hungarian lash, for their masochist tradition

At the Castle Hill, in right is Buda (Obuda)

At the Castle Hill, in right is Buda (Obuda)

Obuda from the Castle Hill

Obuda from the Castle Hill

At the Castle Hill

At the Castle Hill

Buda Castle Ruins

Buda Castle Ruins

The same ruins

The same ruins

Near to the castle

Near to the castle

in the same location, just before starting a rain

in the same location, just before starting a rain

Ticket machine at subway (old subway)

Ticket machine at subway (old subway)

Heroes' Square (Hősök tere), at the end of Andrássy Avenue (with which it comprises part of an extensive World Heritage site), next to City Park

Heroes' Square (Hősök tere), at the end of Andrássy Avenue (with which it comprises part of an extensive World Heritage site), next to City Park

Communist prison cell at House of Terror

Communist "Reconstructed Prison Cells" at House of Terror (basement)

"Hall of Tears" room at basement

"Hall of Tears" room at basement

The Budapest Castle Hill Funicular or Budavári Sikló (Length: 95 metres, Height: 51 metres, Cars: 2, Capacity: 24 passengers per car). Program: 07.30 to 22.00 each day

The Budapest Castle Hill Funicular or Budavári Sikló (Length: 95 metres, Height: 51 metres, Cars: 2, Capacity: 24 passengers per car). Program: 07.30 to 22.00 each day

Inside of Fortuna Boat Hotel (Youth Hostel). Prices: 30 Euro a room with two beds (Off-season) Official website: www.fortunahajo.hu

Inside of Fortuna Boat Hotel (Youth Hostel). Prices: 30 Euro a room with two beds (Off-season) Official website: http://www.fortunahajo.hu

The hotel from outside

The hotel from outside

The Danube near to the hotel

The Danube near to the hotel

The Mall

Other photo with WestEnd City Center

WestEnd City Center

WestEnd City Center

Fountain in the frot of West End Mall

Fountain in the front of WestEnd City Center

Near to the Danube :)

Near to the Danube 🙂

Subway

Subway

City Park with Vajdahunyad Castle

City Park with Vajdahunyad Castle

Valencia (Spain)

Valencia on map

Valencia (in Valencian: València) is the capital of the autonomous community of Valencia and its province. It is the third largest city in Spain and the 21st largest in the European Union. It forms part of an industrial area on the Costa del Azahar.

The estimated population of the city of Valencia proper was 810,064 as of 2008 official statistics. The population of the metropolitan area was 1,583,331 (865 km²). Including the satellite urban area of Sagunto, the total population of the extended region was 1,705,742 (1,161 km²). As of 2007, the mayor of Valencia is Rita Barberá Nolla.

Its main festival, the Fallas (Falles in Valencian), has a reputation throughout Spain, while the world famous Spanish dish paella originated around Valencia.

The city contains a dense monumental heritage (including the Lonja de la Seda (World Heritage Site since 1996), but its landmark is undoubtedly the City of Arts and Sciences an avant-garde and futuristic museum complex.

The Ciutat de les Arts i les Ciències (in Valencian), Ciudad de las Artes y las Ciencias (in Spanish) or City of Arts and Sciences is an ensemble of five areas in the dry riverbed of the now-diverted River Turia in Valencia, Spain.

Designed by Valencian architect Santiago Calatrava in collaboration with Félix Candela, and started in July 1996, it is an impressive example of contemporary architecture.

he „city” is made up of the following, usually known by their Valencian names:

Official website: http://www.cac.es/

Source: Wikipedia

Valencia city tour bus

Valencia city tour bus

. The mock-up of the Cathedral of Valencia (Metropolitan Basilica Cathedral) or Saint Mary of Valencia Cathedral. Most of Valencia Cathedral was built between the XIIIth century and the XVth, and that is why its style is mainly Gothic. One of the supposed Holy Chalices, present around the world, is revered in one of this cathedral's chapels; this chalice has been defended as the true Holy Grail; indeed, most Christian historians all over the world declare that all their evidence points to this Valencian chalice as the most likely candidate for being the authentic cup used at the Last Supper. It was the official papal chalice for many popes, and has been used by many others, most recently by Pope Benedict XVI, on July 9, 2006.[2]. This chalice dates from the 1st century, and was given to the cathedral by king Alfons el Magnànim in 1436.

The mock-up of the Cathedral of Valencia (Metropolitan Basilica Cathedral) or Saint Mary of Valencia Cathedral. Most of Valencia Cathedral was built between the XIIIth century and the XVth, and that is why its style is mainly Gothic. One of the supposed Holy Chalices, present around the world, is revered in one of this cathedral's chapels; this chalice has been defended as the true Holy Grail; indeed, most Christian historians all over the world declare that all their evidence points to this Valencian chalice as the most likely candidate for being the authentic cup used at the Last Supper. It was the official papal chalice for many popes, and has been used by many others, most recently by Pope Benedict XVI, on July 9, 2006. This chalice dates from the 1st century, and was given to the cathedral by king Alfons el Magnànim in 1436.

Other cathedral near to the Turia river

Other cathedral near to the Turia river

Alameda Bridge constructed by Santiago Calatrava

Alameda Bridge constructed by Santiago Calatrava

The park of Turia (garden)

The park of Turia (garden)

A panel at one of the entrances into the park

A panel at one of the entrances into the park

Dolphin

Dolphin

Penguins

Penguins

Shark in the Ocean zone of the complex

Shark in the Ocean zone of the complex

Temperate and Tropical zone

Temperate and Tropical zone

Temperate and Tropical

Temperate and Tropical

The entrance into the tunel from Temperate and Tropical zone

The entrance into the tunel from Temperate and Tropical zone

Jellyfishes (jellies or sea jellies)

Jellyfishes (jellies or sea jellies)

Other tunel

Other tunel

Panel guide

Panel guide

Stingray

Stingray

Fishes into the Temperate and Tropical zone

Fishes into the Temperate and Tropical zone

Ficus (fig)

Ficus (fig)

Under a bridge in the Turia park

Under a bridge in the Turia park

The artificial lake in the centre of the City of Arts and Sciences (Ciudad de las Artes y las Ciencias)

The artificial lake in the centre of the City of Arts and Sciences (Ciudad de las Artes y las Ciencias)

L'Oceanogràfic — Open-air oceanographic park (entrance). Here you can see the prices of tickets: http://www.cac.es/cac/informacion/tarifas)

L'Oceanogràfic — Open-air oceanographic park (entrance). Here you can see the prices of tickets: http://www.cac.es/cac/informacion/tarifas

The tribune from the Dolphinarium (L'Oceanogràfic)

The tribune from the Dolphinarium (L'Oceanogràfic)

The Dolphinarium (L'Oceanogràfic)

The Dolphinarium (L'Oceanogràfic)

A small shark

A small shark

"Wetlands" zone

"Wetlands" zone

Turtle in the "Wetlands"

Turtle in the "Wetlands"

I think this is a spoonbill or egret...

I think this is a spoonbill or egret...

Pink spoonbills :)

Pink spoonbills 🙂

The dome with birds from Wetlands

The dome with birds, fishes and turtles from Wetlands

Some nice palm trees

Some nice palm trees

Vending machines

Vending machines

A map with L'Oceanogràfic

A map with L'Oceanogràfic

In the left part is a good restaurant

In the left part is a good restaurant

El Museu de les Ciències Príncipe Felipe — Science museum

El Museu de les Ciències Príncipe Felipe — Science museum

Nice arhitecture

Nice arhitecture

The Devil...

The Devil is with us 🙂

The Music Palace (Palau De La Música)

The Music Palace (Palau De La Música)

Simply beautiful !

Simply beautiful !

A map at Valencia Metro (metrovalencia)

A map at Valencia Metro (metrovalencia)

Alameda subway station

Alameda subway station

Oświęcim (Poland)

Oświęcim, Lesser Poland Voivodeship (German: Auschwitz, Yiddish Oshpitsin אָשפּיצין, Romany: Aushvitsa, Osvyenchim, Czech: Osvětim, Slovak: Osvienčim, Russian: Освенцим) is a town in southern Poland, situated 50 kilometres (31 mi) west of Kraków, near the confluence of the rivers Vistula (Wisła) and Soła.

Click on the map for more informations about Oświęcim

Click on the map for more informations about Oświęcim

The town became part of the Lesser Poland Voivodeship in 1998 after previously being in the Bielsko-Biała Voivodeship since 1975.

The three main camps were Auschwitz I, II (Birkenau), and III (Monowitz).

Auschwitz I, the original concentration camp, served as the administrative center for the whole complex, and was the site of the deaths of roughly 70,000 people, mostly ethnic Poles and Soviet prisoners of war.

Auschwitz-Birkenau (Konzentrationslager Auschwitz) was the largest of Nazi Germany’s concentration camps, established in Nazi German occupied Poland.

The camp took its German name from the nearby Polish town of Oświęcim.

Birkenau, the German translation of pol. Brzezinka (birch tree), refers to a small village nearby, mostly destroyed by the Germans.

Following the German invasion of Poland in September 1939, Oświęcim was annexed by Nazi Germany and renamed Auschwitz, the town’s German name.

The surrounding work camps, of which there were approximately forty, were closely connected to German industry and were associated with arms factories, foundries and mines. The largest work camp was Auschwitz III Monowitz, named after the Polish village of Monowice.

Auschwitz I

Auschwitz II (Birkenau)

Auschwitz III (Monowitz)

Source: Wikipedia


A guide panel in the center of Oświęcim

A guide panel in the center of Oświęcim

Inside of Auschwitz I (the original camp)

Inside of Auschwitz I (the original camp)

Blocks from Auschwitz I

Blocks from Auschwitz I

Road through barracks from Auschwitz II (Birkenau)

Road through barracks from Auschwitz II (Birkenau)

Some remained barracks from Auschwitz II (Birkenau). The majority were destroyed by allies

Some remained barracks from Auschwitz II (Birkenau). The majority were destroyed by allies

A panel with prisoneers when they enter to the camp

A panel with prisoneers when they enter to the camp

Crematorium from Auschwitz I

Crematorium from Auschwitz I

The main road from Auschwitz I

The main road from Auschwitz I

The swimming pool from Auschwitz I, made for prisoneers

The swimming pool from Auschwitz I, made for prisoneers

Bunk beds in the Auschwitz I

Bunk beds in the Auschwitz I

Stuffs in Auschwitz I

Stuffs in Auschwitz I

Blocks in Bunk Auschwitz I

Blocks in Bunk Auschwitz I

Preserved blocks from Auschwitz I

Preserved blocks from Auschwitz I

Near to the entrance of Auschwitz I (Arbeit macht frei "work brings freedom" or "work shall set you free/will free you" or "work liberates" and, literally in English, "work makes (one) free")

Near to the entrance of Auschwitz I (Arbeit macht frei "work brings freedom" or "work shall set you free/will free you" or "work liberates" and, literally in English, "work makes (one) free")

Near to the entrance in Auschwitz I

Near to the entrance in Auschwitz I

Before to the entrance in Auschwitz I

Before to the entrance in Auschwitz I

The parking near to the entrance of Auschwitz I Museum

The parking near to the entrance of Auschwitz I Museum

Catholic church in the center of Oświęcim (Old Market Square-Rynek Główny)

Catholic church in the center of Oświęcim (Old Market Square-Rynek Główny)

The Central Sauna in Auschwitz II Birkenau

The Central Sauna in Auschwitz II Birkenau

International monuments in Auschwitz II Birkenau

International monuments in Auschwitz II Birkenau

Jewish candles

Jewish candles

The main gates from the entrance to the Auschwitz II Birkenau

The main gates from the entrance to the Auschwitz II Birkenau

Kraków (Poland)

Kraków (Krakow or Cracow) is one of the largest and oldest cities in Poland, and is a popular tourist location, containing a World Heritage Site in the historic centre.

Situated on the Vistula river (Polish: Wisła) in the Lesser Poland region, the city dates back to the 7th century. Kraków has traditionally been one of the leading centres of Polish academic, cultural and artistic life, and is one of Poland’s most important economic centres.

It was the capital of Poland from 1038 to 1596, the capital of the Grand Duchy of Kraków from 1846 to 1918, and the capital of Kraków Voivodeship from the 14th century to 1999.

It is now the capital of the Lesser Poland Voivodeship.

The city has grown from a Stone Age settlement to Poland’s second most important city. It has grown out from a hamlet on Wawel Hill, and was reported as a busy trading centre of Slavonic Europe in 965.

With the emergence of the Second Polish Republic, Kraków restored its role as a major academic and cultural centre with the establishment of new universities.

Source: Wikipedia

Souvenirs inside of Sukiennice (Cloth Hall) in Main Market Square

Souvenirs inside of Sukiennice (Cloth Hall) in Main Market Square

A big wheel

A big wheel

Neo-Gothic chapel of Blessed Bronisława erected by the Austrian authorities in 1856-1861 inside the citadel surrounding the Kościuszko Mound in the Zwierzyniec district of Kraków

Neo-Gothic chapel of Blessed Bronisława erected by the Austrian authorities in 1856-1861 inside the citadel surrounding the Kościuszko Mound in the Zwierzyniec district of Kraków

At the top of Kościuszko Mound (Kopiec Kościuszki) 326 metres (1,070 ft) above sea level, with a panoramic view of the Vistula River and the city

At the top of Kościuszko Mound (Kopiec Kościuszki) 326 metres (1,070 ft) above sea level, with a panoramic view of the Vistula River and the city

Other view from Kościuszko Mound

Other view from Kościuszko Mound

Other view

Other view

Restaurant

Restaurant

A panel with the history of the Mound

A panel with the history of the Mound

Flow canal

Flow canal

On the road to the top...

On the road to the top...

Kościuszko Mound, Kraków. Note the group of visitors atop the upper brick wall (extreme left) for actual scale

Note the group of visitors atop the upper brick wall (extreme left) for actual scale

A Polish cannon

A Polish cannon

In the car, on the road to the centre

In the car, on the road to the centre

A nice street near to the Main Market Square, in the center of Kraków

A nice street near to the Main Market Square, in the center of Kraków

Chişinău (Moldova)

Chişinău (also known as Kishinev, Russian: Кишинёв Kishinyov), is the capital and largest municipality of Moldova. It is also its main industrial and commercial centre and is located in the middle of the country, on the river Bîc.

For more details click on the map

For more details click on the map

Economically, the city is the most prosperous in Moldova and is one of the main transportation hubs of the region.

As the most important municipality in Moldova, Chişinău has a broad range of educational facilities.

The proportion of green spaces in the city is one of the highest among major European cities.

According to one version, the name comes from the archaic Romanian word chişla (meaning „spring”, „source of water”) and nouă („new”), because it was built around a small spring. Nowadays, the spring is located at the corner of Pushkin and Albişoara streets.

There is another city named Chişineu (alternative spelling: Chişinău) in Western Romania, near the border with Hungary, but its relation to Chişinău is disputed.

Its Hungarian name is Kisjenő (kis „small” + the eponym „Jenő”), from which the Romanian name originates.

Chişinău is also known in Russian as Кишинёв (Kishinyov). It is written Kişinöv in the Latin Gagauz alphabet. It was also written as Кишинэу in the Moldovan Cyrillic alphabet in Soviet times. Historically, the English language name for the city, „Kishinev,” was based on the modified Russian one because it entered the English language via Russian at the time Chişinău was part of the Russian Empire.

Moldova and is administratively subdivided into 32 districts, 2 autonomous units, and 3 municipalities. Chişinău is one of the municipalities.

Besides the city itself, the municipality comprises 34 other suburban localities, and is subdivided into sectors, each comprising a part of the city itself and several suburbs. The municipality in its totality elects a mayor and a local council, which then name 5 pretors, one for each sector.

The five sectors of Chişinău are:

Source: Wikipedia

Near the Arch of Triumph, in the center

Near the Arch of Triumph, in the center

Ministry of Agriculture

Ministry of Agriculture

The presidential palace

The presidential palace (old building, now is in reconstruction after incidents from April 2009)

An old soviet Lada car at the Moldavian Police

An old soviet Lada car at the Moldavian Police

A panel with the message "Chisinau - noi suntem viitorul tau!" put by the mayor of the city, Dorin Chirtoaca

A panel with the message "Chisinau - noi suntem viitorul tau! (We are the future of the Chisinau)" put by the mayor of the city, Dorin Chirtoaca

Parliament

The Parliament of the Republic of Moldova

The statue of Stephen III of Moldavia or Stephen III (c. 1432 - July 2, 1504), also known as Stephen the Great

The statue of Stephen III of Moldavia or Stephen III (c. 1432 - July 2, 1504), also known as Stephen the Great

Theoretical High School (Lyceum) Gheorghe Asachi (The best from Moldova)

Theoretical High School (Lyceum) Gheorghe Asachi (The best from Moldova)

St. Pantelimon Church, 1891

St. Pantelimon Church, 1891

"Malldova" shopping mall (www.shoppingmalldova.md)

Jumbo shopping centre

A poster of the Communist Party of Moldova

A poster of the Communist Party of Moldova

Some prices at webcams (1500 moldavian lei mean almost 400 romanian lei or 95 euro)

Some prices at webcams (1500 moldavian lei mean almost 400 romanian lei or 95 euro)

:)

🙂

:))

:))

The Chisinau Cathedral (19th century Nativity Cathedral of Moldovan Orthodox Church, under Church of Russia)

The Chisinau Cathedral (19th century Nativity Cathedral of Moldovan Orthodox Church, under Church of Russia)

The Chisinau Cathedral

The Chisinau Cathedral

Cathedral’s belfry, restored in 1996

Cathedral’s belfry, restored in 1996

Car plate

Car plate

Free International University of Moldova (ULIM)

Free International University of Moldova (ULIM)

SKYTOWER Business Centre

SKYTOWER Business Centre

Popasul Dacilor restaurant "The stoppage of Dacians"

Popasul Dacilor restaurant "The stoppage of Dacians"

Original wooden style

Original wooden style

The walls are decorated with natural animal skin

The walls are decorated with natural animal skin

The best "barbarian" choice to eat...

The best "barbarian" choice to eat...

Tutrakan (Bulgaria)

Tutrakan (Bulgarian: Тутракан, Romanian: Turtucaia) is a town in northeastern Bulgaria, part of Silistra Province. It is situated on the right bank of the Danube opposite the Romanian town of Olteniţa in the very west of Southern Dobruja, 58 km east of Rousse and 62 km west of Silistra.

The town was founded by the Ancient Romans in the end of the first half of the 1st century under the name Transmarisca. The settlement was part of the Roman military boundary in the 1st and 3rd century and reached its apogee in the 4th century, when, under the personal management of Diocletian, it was made one of the largest strongholds of the Danubian limes.

The ancient town and fortress were destroyed in the beginning of the 7th century and the modern town carrying its present name emerged in the end of the century, remaining a military centre through the Middle Ages as part of the Bulgarian Empire, which was conquered by the Ottomans in the late 14th century.

Tutrakan was liberated from Ottoman rule during the Russo-Turkish War of 1877-78 by Russians to become part of the Kingdom of Bulgaria. After the Second Balkan War, it was incorporated, along with all of Southern Dobruja, in Romania until 1940, when the pre-World War II Treaty of Craiova returned the territory to Bulgaria.

During World War I, the town, then part of Romania, was the site of the important Battle of Tutrakan during which Central Powers forces defeated decisively the Romanian Army.

Source: Wikipedia

A shower panel

A shower panel

Derrick (elevator) on the Danube shore

Derrick (elevator) on the Danube shore

Orthodox Church

Orthodox Church

TV Tower

Tutrakan TV Tower (Build: 1979, Height: 98 m "322 ft")

The pontoon

The pontoon

The Danube (Dunav in Bulgarian)

The Danube (Dunav in Bulgarian)

Sveshtari (Bulgaria)

Thracian Tomb of Sveshtari

Sveshtari royal tomb below Ginina Mogila Mound - 4th - 3th century BC (www.getika.com)

Sveshtari royal tomb below Ginina Mogila Mound - 4th - 3th century BC (www.getika.com)

The Thracian Tomb of Sveshtari is situated 2,5 km southwest of the village of Sveshtari, Razgrad Province, which is located 42 km northeast of Razgrad, in the northeast of Bulgaria.

Discovered in 1982 in a mound, this 3rd century BC Thracian tomb reflects the fundamental structural principles of Thracian cult buildings.

The tomb’s architectural decor is considered to be unique, with polychrome half-human, half-plant caryatids and painted murals.

The ten female figures carved in high relief on the walls of the central chamber and the decorations of the lunette in its vault are the only examples of this type found so far in the Thracian lands.

It is a remarkable reminder of the culture of the Getae, a Thracian people who were in contact with the Hellenistic and Hyperborean worlds, according to ancient geographers.

Source: Wikipedia

A mine on the road from Rousse to Sveshtari

A mine on the road from Rousse to Sveshtari

Near Sveshtari village

Near Sveshtari village

A table in the forest, near to the Reception centre

A table in the forest, near to the Reception centre

The forest from behind the Reception centre

The forest from behind the Reception centre

Thracians outside the Reception centre

Thracians outside the Reception centre

The road to the tombs

The road to the tombs

The principal tomb (royal tomb)

The principal tomb (royal tomb)

Reception centre

Reception centre

Royal tomb

Royal tomb

Picture postcart and calendar with the Thracian Tomb of Sveshtari

Picture postcart and calendar with the Thracian Tomb of Sveshtari

Prospectus from the Reception centre

Prospectus from the Reception centre

Prospectus with the tomb

Prospectus with the tomb

The ticket for the entrance to the Sveshtari royal tomb (5 Bulgarian lev "лев")

The ticket for the entrance to the Sveshtari royal tomb (5 Bulgarian lev "лев" which mean 2.5 euro)