Bălţi (Moldova)

For more informations, click on the map

Bălţi (Polish: Bielce, Russian: Бельцы [Bel’tsy] and Бэлць [Bėlts’], Ukrainian: Бєльці [Byel’tsi], Yiddish: בעלץ [Belts]) is a city in Moldova. It is the second largest in terms of area and economic importance after Chişinău, and the third largest in terms of population after Chişinău and Tiraspol. The city is one of the five Moldovan municipalities. Bălţi, sometimes also called „the northern capital”, is a major industrial, cultural and commercial centre and transportation hub in the north of the country. It is situated 127 kilometres (79 mi) north of the capital Chişinău, and is located on the river Răut, a tributary of the Dniester, on a hilly landscape in the Bălţi steppe.

The word „bălţi” (pl. of Romanian sing. „baltă„) means „swamps”, „puddles”, or „pools”. It is believed that the city had been named thus because it was founded on a hill dominating the wetland formed where the creek Răuţel („Little Răut”) falls into the river Răut.

In addition to the official name Bălţi and the Russian name Бельцы (Beltsy), between 1940-1989 in Moldovan Cyrillic alphabet, and after 1989 in Russian, the name was/is also rendered in Cyrillic as Бэлць.

Theaters:

  • Vasile Alecsandri theatre
  • „Eugene Ionesco” Theatre
  • „Licurici” Republican Puppet Theatre
  • „B.P.Hajdeu” Republican Drama-Muzical Theatre
  • „Mihai Eminescu” National Theatre
  • „Luceafarul” Republican Theatre
  • Municipal Theatre „Satiricus I.L. Caragiale”

Museums and art galleries

  • „Exhibition of the Union of painters „Constantin Brâncuşi”
  • Artum Art Gallery

According to the 2004 Moldovan Census, data submitted by the Department of Statistics and Sociology of the Republic of Moldova, the population of municipality of Bălţi was 127,561, of which the population of the city itself was 122,669, and that of the suburban villages of Elizaveta and Sadovoe was of 3,523, respectively 1,369. Of these, 58,418 were men and 69,143 were women.

Ethnic Groups, 2004:

Ethnicity Number %
Moldovan 66,877 52.4 %
Ukrainian 30,288 23.7 %
Russian 24,526 19.2 %
Romanian 2,258 1.8 %
Pole 862 0.7 %
Jewish 411 0.3 %
Bulgarian 297 0.2 %
Roma 272 0.2 %
Gagauz 243 0.2 %
other 1,527 1.2 %
not declared 183 0.1 %

A info panel with international routes in the bus station of Bălţi

Bus station (Autogară)

A soviet scales 😀

This nice dog diddn't want to eat our plăcinta 😦

The main street near the bus station.We take the bus from here, which goes to the city center

An old soviet trolley

The mayor prepare the city for the date of May 9, when Germany lost the war and sign the surrender act before soviets at Berlin

A street near to the center

Memorial for soviet soldiers from WWII

Mishka (Мишка) mascot from 1980 Summer Olympics in Moscow, Soviet Union

Bălţi-City Station at Moldovan Railway

On the platform of Bălţi-City Station

A guide panel in the center

Decebal street (Decebal was the king of Dacia in the time of wars against romans 101-102,105-106)

We pass on this street when we come from railway station to city center

Theoretical Highschool Mihai Eminescu

In left it was nr 3 🙂

Now it is 589...

A nice XIX century building in the center (i think this is matrimonial palace)

A wedding in the city center

Vasile Alecsandri theatre in the square from the city center with the same name

Cinema Patria (the subtitle is in russian)

A panel with some great citizens from the city

A monument for the holocaust

It says "for the jewish victims killed by fascists in the second world war"

Gogol Theoretical Highschool-School nr. 6 (you can notice the soviet coat of arms up)

A soviet medium tank T-34

A banner with the message "the victory day for the soviet people in the great war for defending the homeland"

A monument of Stefan the Great (2003)

An old Lada car for the Police (Poliţia)

A panel with the train routes in the Bălţi-City Station

Inside the train Moscow-Chişinău (you can notice the curtains with Moldova)

We buy a ticket on platzcart on the route Bălţi-Chişinău with the international train from Moscow. The price for the ticket is 31 moldavian lei, which means 8 romanian lei or 2 euro. (the time of travel is about 3.20 hours because train pass through Ungheni)

Chişinău Zoo

Tighina (Moldova)

Click on the map for more informations

Click on the map for more informations

Bender, also known as Tighina (Romanian; Russian: Бендеры, Bendery; Ukrainian: Бендери, Bendery) is a city within the internationally recognized borders of Moldova under de facto control of the unrecognized PMR since 1992. Located on the right (western) bank of the river Dniester, together with its suburb Proteagailovca, the city forms a municipality, which is separate from Transnistria according to the Moldovan law. Bender is located in the buffer zone established at the end of the 1992 War of Transnistria.

While the Joint Control Commission has overriding powers in the city, Transnistria has de facto administrative control.

First mentioned in 1408 as Тягянякяча (Tyagyanyakyacha) in a document in Old Slavonic, the town was known in the Middle Ages as Tighina in Moldavian sources and Bender in Ottoman sources. The fortress and the city were called Bender for the most part of the time they were a rayah of the Ottomans (1538-1812), and during most of the time they belonged to the Russian Empires (1828-1917).

They were known as Tighina in the Principality of Moldavia, in the early part of the Russian Empire period (1812-1828), and during the time the city belonged to Romania (1918-1940).

The city is part of the historical region of Bessarabia. During the Soviet period the city was known in the Moldavian SSR as Бендер (Bender) in Moldovan (Romanian) written then with the Cyrillic alphabet, and as Бендéры (Bendery) in Russian. In the independent Moldova, officially it is known as Bender, but otherwise both names Bender and Tighina are used.

Tighina was part of the Moldavian Democratic Republic in 1917-1918, and after 1918, as part of Bessarabia, the city belonged to Romania, where it was the seat of Tighina County.

Along with Bessarabia, the city was occupied by the Soviet Union on June 28, 1940, following an ultimatum. In the course of World War II, it was retaken by Romania in July 1941, and again by the USSR in August 1944.

In 1940-41, and 1941-1991 it was one of the four „republican cities” (i.e. not subordinated to a district) of the Moldavian Soviet Socialist Republic, one of the 15 republics of the Soviet Union. Since 1991, the city is part of the independent Republic of Moldova.

Famous people born in the city include:

Soure: Wikipedia

The train which take us from Chisinau to Tighina (2 hours; 5.60 Moldavian lei is the ticket, almost 0.33 euro)

The train which take us from Chisinau to Tighina (2 hours; 5.60 Moldavian lei is the ticket, almost 0.33 euro)

The train...in Tighina

The train...in Tighina

Inside the train; with old Soviet wooden seats :P

Inside the train; with old Soviet wooden seats 😛

The platform from Tighina railway station (second station in the city)

The platform from Tighina railway station (second station in the city)

1,520 mm (4 ft 11+7⁄8 in) broad gauge or Russian gauge

1,520 mm (4 ft 11+7⁄8 in) broad gauge or Russian gauge

The moldavian cat was not for sale :)

The moldavian cat was not for sale 🙂

Kvass (квас) on the street

Kvass (квас) on the street

YOu can observe the difference between cars :)

You can observe the difference between cars 🙂

Just Lada :P

Just Lada 😛

Last year, Tighina celebrate 600 years of history (1408-2008)

Last year, Tighina celebrate 600 years of history (1408-2008)

Some nice flowers...

Some nice flowers...

Sheriff supermarket

Sheriff supermarket

The intersection from Sheriff supermarket

The intersection from Sheriff supermarket

A bus and trolley

A bus and trolley

An exchange currency panel

An exchange currency panel (26.09.2009)

Commercial centre

Commercial centre

The bazaar

The bazaar

On a walk to the Dniester

On a walk to the Dniester

Some communist blocks with 4 floors

Some communist blocks with 4 floors

A panel with the year of the foundation of Tighina

A panel with the year of the foundation of Tighina

Other communist blocks...

Other communist blocks...

A monument of an Infantry fighting vehicle of the breakaway Transnistrian "army"

A monument of an Infantry fighting vehicle of the breakaway Transnistrian "army"

Other monument

Other monument

A campaign against drugs

A campaign against drugs

The entrance into the city after you cross the bridge from Transnistria

The entrance into the city after you cross the bridge from Transnistria

Joint Control Commission Russian post near to the bridge, in Moldovan side.

Joint Control Commission post near to the bridge, in Moldovan side. Russian troops and vehicle

The railway bridge over the Dniester

The railway bridge over the Dniester

The walls of the fortress build by Stephen the Great and reconstructed by Suleiman the Magnificent

The walls of the fortress build by Stephen the Great and reconstructed by Suleiman the Magnificent

Other photo with the wall...

Other photo with the wall...

Old ship on the Dniester

Old rusty ship on the Dniester

The Dniester (Nistru, Дністер)

The Dniester (Nistru, Дністер)

The bridge over Dniester (just for cars)

The bridge over Dniester (just for cars and tanks)

A sweet cat :P

A sweet cat 😛

Chişinău (Moldova)

Chişinău (also known as Kishinev, Russian: Кишинёв Kishinyov), is the capital and largest municipality of Moldova. It is also its main industrial and commercial centre and is located in the middle of the country, on the river Bîc.

For more details click on the map

For more details click on the map

Economically, the city is the most prosperous in Moldova and is one of the main transportation hubs of the region.

As the most important municipality in Moldova, Chişinău has a broad range of educational facilities.

The proportion of green spaces in the city is one of the highest among major European cities.

According to one version, the name comes from the archaic Romanian word chişla (meaning „spring”, „source of water”) and nouă („new”), because it was built around a small spring. Nowadays, the spring is located at the corner of Pushkin and Albişoara streets.

There is another city named Chişineu (alternative spelling: Chişinău) in Western Romania, near the border with Hungary, but its relation to Chişinău is disputed.

Its Hungarian name is Kisjenő (kis „small” + the eponym „Jenő”), from which the Romanian name originates.

Chişinău is also known in Russian as Кишинёв (Kishinyov). It is written Kişinöv in the Latin Gagauz alphabet. It was also written as Кишинэу in the Moldovan Cyrillic alphabet in Soviet times. Historically, the English language name for the city, „Kishinev,” was based on the modified Russian one because it entered the English language via Russian at the time Chişinău was part of the Russian Empire.

Moldova and is administratively subdivided into 32 districts, 2 autonomous units, and 3 municipalities. Chişinău is one of the municipalities.

Besides the city itself, the municipality comprises 34 other suburban localities, and is subdivided into sectors, each comprising a part of the city itself and several suburbs. The municipality in its totality elects a mayor and a local council, which then name 5 pretors, one for each sector.

The five sectors of Chişinău are:

Source: Wikipedia

Near the Arch of Triumph, in the center

Near the Arch of Triumph, in the center

Ministry of Agriculture

Ministry of Agriculture

The presidential palace

The presidential palace (old building, now is in reconstruction after incidents from April 2009)

An old soviet Lada car at the Moldavian Police

An old soviet Lada car at the Moldavian Police

A panel with the message "Chisinau - noi suntem viitorul tau!" put by the mayor of the city, Dorin Chirtoaca

A panel with the message "Chisinau - noi suntem viitorul tau! (We are the future of the Chisinau)" put by the mayor of the city, Dorin Chirtoaca

Parliament

The Parliament of the Republic of Moldova

The statue of Stephen III of Moldavia or Stephen III (c. 1432 - July 2, 1504), also known as Stephen the Great

The statue of Stephen III of Moldavia or Stephen III (c. 1432 - July 2, 1504), also known as Stephen the Great

Theoretical High School (Lyceum) Gheorghe Asachi (The best from Moldova)

Theoretical High School (Lyceum) Gheorghe Asachi (The best from Moldova)

St. Pantelimon Church, 1891

St. Pantelimon Church, 1891

"Malldova" shopping mall (www.shoppingmalldova.md)

Jumbo shopping centre

A poster of the Communist Party of Moldova

A poster of the Communist Party of Moldova

Some prices at webcams (1500 moldavian lei mean almost 400 romanian lei or 95 euro)

Some prices at webcams (1500 moldavian lei mean almost 400 romanian lei or 95 euro)

:)

🙂

:))

:))

The Chisinau Cathedral (19th century Nativity Cathedral of Moldovan Orthodox Church, under Church of Russia)

The Chisinau Cathedral (19th century Nativity Cathedral of Moldovan Orthodox Church, under Church of Russia)

The Chisinau Cathedral

The Chisinau Cathedral

Cathedral’s belfry, restored in 1996

Cathedral’s belfry, restored in 1996

Car plate

Car plate

Free International University of Moldova (ULIM)

Free International University of Moldova (ULIM)

SKYTOWER Business Centre

SKYTOWER Business Centre

Popasul Dacilor restaurant "The stoppage of Dacians"

Popasul Dacilor restaurant "The stoppage of Dacians"

Original wooden style

Original wooden style

The walls are decorated with natural animal skin

The walls are decorated with natural animal skin

The best "barbarian" choice to eat...

The best "barbarian" choice to eat...

Cricova (Moldova)

Cricova is the famous Moldovan winery, located in the city with the same name located at 15 kilometres (9.3 mi) north of Chişinău. Famous wine cellars make it a popular attraction for tourists.

The wine cellars of Cricova is second largest wine cellar in Moldova, after Milestii Mici (largest in the world). It boasts a mere 120 kilometres (75 mi) of labyrinthine roadways, versus MM’s 200 kilometres (120 mi), tunnels have existed under Cricova since the XVth century, when limestone was dug out to help build Chisinau. They were converted into an underground wine emporium in the 1950s.

The territory used to be a mine for limestone, a building material. In some branches excavation is still active, so the cellar is still growing. Other famous wineries in Moldova include Cojuşna and Mileştii Mici.

Source: Wikipedia

Travel Journal

„We decided a long time ago to visit Cricova. It seemed to be a nice destination for the end of this spring.

So the big day came. At nine o’clock in the morning we all were ready to start our trip, so we got up in the bus and took our seats. We must say the price of a trip to Cricova, for a group of 20 persons costs 135 lei (~9 euros). How Cricova is situated only at 11 Km from Chisinau, in over 20 minutes we were there. It was a good idea to start our trip in the morning, because the day was very hot, so we could “get fried” in the minibus! =D

Arriving there, the guide told us a sad little rumor: the electric train that should carry us through the tunnels of Cricova was broken, so we should take the bus, because the distance was pretty big: over 60 km to see!

The gates opened, so the trip began. We saw in front of our eyes a big, wide road, which was dishing too fast. The first impression was that we hit in a little scary story, but this feeling passed quickly.

From the beginning we felt the difference concerning the air: in the tunnels, the temperature never rises up 12-14 C, while the humidity also stays constants-97 %. We can give you an important advice: if you want to visit Cricova, in no matter what season, you have to take some warm clothes, if not; you’ll get a bit frozen ;).

While we were advancing in the subways of Cricova, the guide told us that we are at 40-50 meters under ground. You should know that at the beginning, this place was a mine from where was taking out white rock, used to build edifices in Chisinau-from here it comes the name of “white city”. Totally, the roads of Cricova have a length of 120 Km, but only 60 are intended for wines, other 60 km serve as a mine; in present from there they are extracting white rock.

The roads become streets and boulevards, as they have names: Ariadne’s thread Street, Cabernet Street, Dionysus Street, Champaign’s Boulevard, names chosen by the type of wine placed on that “street”.

Our first stop was on the Cabernet Street. We saw a lot of barrels, smalls (232 litters) and big (453 litters), plenty of this kind of wine. The casks were made of oak wood, so the taste of wine can change if it rests for a long time put in there.

At the second stop, we stepped on the Champaign’s Boulevard, where the guide led us into a chamber where were kept the future Champaign. Here we found out how does this drink is made. The all period while the wine changes into Champaign, ready to be sold, takes 5 years.

The third hall we saw was in that are kept the personal collection of different persons, but also the most important bottles of wine from there. At the beginning of the chamber, we noticed a memorial made for the persons who founded Cricova and the statue of Dionysus.

We saw the Hermann Göring wine’s collection, (Mosel from 1935) brought here by the Bolsheviks after World War II. In the same area, we caught sight on old French wines (1936) and other collections of states from USSR. The personal wine collection of Vladimir Putin is kept at Cricova, the rental of a bottle costs 1$/year.Altogether, the whole cellar comprises over 1.3 million bottles.

After visiting this extraordinary place, we left it for another site: the formal halls from Cricova, avaible only for the officials. We hadn’t the permission to touch the table that has about 60 seats, because we could leave stamps, ha-ha! We saw also the favourite chamber of the ex- president of Moldova, Vladimir Voronin, who comes there to “take a break”.

After a one and half hour our trip finished and we had the vague sensation that we have lost something there. Maybe that was because we rested a bit amazed, but pleased for everything we saw. We didn’t want to leave that place, but we had to.

We advise everyone to visit Cricova, with any occasion, because there you have the possibility to pass a little part of your life in a “forgiven” place, where the Time does nothing more than to dust the bottles and to raise the quality and the price of a good wine.”


An imitation of a stronghold on the territory of Cricova.

An imitation of a stronghold on the territory of Cricova.

First view of the road which leads us to the Cricova's cellar.

First view of the road which leads us to the Cricova's cellar.

A cellar located on Cabernet Street, where is kept the Pinot wine.

A cellar located on Cabernet Street, where is kept the Pinot wine.

In these barrels is kept the Cabernet wine, the white dust on the floor testifies the fact that in the past, this place was a mine of withe rock.

In these barrels is kept the Cabernet wine, the white dust on the floor testifies the fact that in the past, this place was a mine of withe rock.

A common barrel in the subways of Cricova,made of American oak. The wine changes its taste if it's kept in this kind of cask.

A common barrel in the subways of Cricova,made of American oak. The wine changes its taste if it's kept in this kind of cask.

A 453 litters barrel for keeping the Cabernet wine.

A 453 litters barrel for keeping the Cabernet wine.

The same barrel, with a wine inquest on it (Cabernet-Sauvignon, made in 2007).

The same barrel, with a wine inquest on it (Cabernet-Sauvignon, made in 2007).

A shower that attentions the pedestrian crossing.

A shower that attentions the pedestrian crossing.

The name of the chamber where the Campaign is kept.

The name of the chamber where the Campaign is kept.

A schedule which explains the process of Remuage-process used for preparing the Champagne.The improvement of this drink till it can be sold is based on changing the angle of the bottle, for all the uncleanliness set in the cork. After that,the cork is frozen, so the uncleanliness can be taken without damaging the Champagne. The whole procedure takes 5 years.

A schedule which explains the process of Remuage-process used for preparing the Champagne.The improvement of this drink till it can be sold is based on changing the angle of the bottle, for all the uncleanliness set in the cork. After that,the cork is frozen, so the uncleanliness can be taken without damaging the Champagne. The whole procedure takes 5 years.

The "first" Champagne containing uncleanliness, before passing through "Remuage" process.

The "first" Champagne containing uncleanliness, before passing through "Remuage" process.

The cellar where the Champagne is kept, place located on Champagne's Boulevard.

The cellar where the Champagne is kept, place located on Champagne's Boulevard.

A view through the subways of Cricova.

A view through the subways of Cricova.

Old wine from 1995.

Old wine from 1995.

The Hermann Goring wine's collection, Mosel from 1935. Another part of collection is conserved in Ukraine,Crimea.

The Hermann Goring wine's collection, Mosel from 1935. Another part of collection is conserved in Ukraine,Crimea.

Mouldiness and bacterium developed on a wine bottle. As we said, the humidity in the cellars of Cricova is over 97 %.

Mouldiness and bacterium developed on a wine bottle. As we said, the humidity in the cellars of Cricova is over 97 %.

The cellar where is kept the wine collections.

The cellar where is kept the wine collections.

The personal wine collection of Vladimir Putin.

The personal wine collection of Vladimir Putin.

A closer view on the slate information.

A closer view on the slate information.

The oldest bottle of Wine from Cricova, taken from Israel, in 1902.

The oldest bottle of Wine from Cricova, taken from Israel, in 1902.

A Romanian "Grasa de Cotnari" wine bottle, from 1979.

A Romanian "Grasa de Cotnari" wine bottle, from 1979.

An old French wine from 1936. In 2008, a bottle of this kind was sold for 60.000 euros, for a personal collection.

An old French wine from 1936. In 2008, a bottle of this kind was sold for 60.000 euros, for a personal collection.

The guide told us that this small table with small chairs is an imitation of an old Moldavian custom "La botul calului"("At the muzzle's horse").We don't know if we should believe her or not.Anyway, the cart didn't go in the photo :) .

The guide told us that this small table with small chairs is an imitation of an old Moldavian custom "La botul calului"("At the muzzle's horse").We don't know if we should believe her or not.Anyway, the cart didn't go in the photo 🙂 .

A small official chamber from Cricova.

A small official chamber from Cricova.

A picture of "Moldavian wedding" painted on a wall.

A picture of "Moldavian wedding" painted on a wall.

Another official place.

Another official place.

The official chamber from Cricova,with the "untouchable" table. Around it,there are 60 chairs.

The official chamber from Cricova,with the "untouchable" table. Around it,there are 60 chairs.

The favourite relaxing chamber from Cricova of the ex-president of Moldova, Vladimir Voronin.

The favourite relaxing chamber from Cricova of the ex-president of Moldova, Vladimir Voronin.

A modern WC, including a small chamber for the smokers.

A modern WC, including a small chamber for the smokers.

Tiraspol (Transnistria)

Tiraspol (Romanian: Tiraspol; Russian: Тирасполь and Ukrainian: Тирасполь) is the second largest city in Moldova and is the capital and administrative centre of the de facto independent Pridnestrovian Moldavian Republic – TransnistriaPMR”).

The city is located on the eastern bank of the Dniester River.

transnistria-harta-gdb-rferl-org

Click on the map

Tiraspol is a regional hub of light industry, such as furniture and electrical goods production.

The toponym consists of two words: Tiras — the ancient Greek name for the Dniester River, and polis – city.

In 1989 the city had a population of about 190,000 and in 1992 203,000. 41% were Russians, 32% Ukrainians and 18% were Moldovans (Romanians).

Sister cities:

2004 Census in Transnistria:

Total population (including Bender): 555,347 (percentages below refer to this first figure)

Total population (minus Bender): 450,337

  • Moldovans (Romanians): 31.9%
  • Russians: 30.3%
  • Ukrainians: 28.8%
  • Bulgarians: 2%
  • Poles: 2%
  • Gagauz: 1.5%
  • Jews: 1.3%
  • Belarusians: 1%
  • Germans: 0.6%
  • Others: 0.5%

Transnistria, also known as Trans-Dniester, Transdniestria, and Pridnestrovie is a disputed region in southeast Europe.

Since its declaration of independence in 1990, followed by the War of Transnistria in 1992, it is governed by the unrecognized Pridnestrovian Moldavian Republic (PMR), which claims the left bank of the river Dniester and the city of Bendery (Tighina) within the former Moldavian SSR.

The modern Republic of Moldova does not recognize the secession and considers PMR-controlled territories to be a part of Moldova’s sovereign territory.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Travel jurnal

„… Many people know about Tiraspol, but few of them had the chance to go there. We were lucky to pass a day on the left side of river Dniester.

From the beginning of the day, we took the bus from the Central station, not before to buy the tickets from a separated ticket office.

It costs 32 lei/person (~3$). After an hour, we arrived at the customs, where we were asked to leave the bus.

A nice woman, who takes care that every passenger passes the frontier, led us to the counter from where we could take an inquest to complete it an official procedure that allow you to pass in Transnistria.

We paid 22 lei/person after we stayed in a big crowd, whereupon the frontier guard gave us a part of the inquest without whom we don’t have the permission to leave Transnistria.

Before that, the persons who aren’t citizens of Republic of Moldova have to register to another wicket, it’s enough to show the passport. We returned at our bus and continued the road till the station of Tiraspol.

The driver stopped in Tighina for few minutes, before we passed through the bridge who rememberd me about the conflict of Transnistria form 1992.At the beginning of the bridge we saw a Russian tanc-a way for showing the power of those who were fighting for “liberty”.

In less than 15 minutes we arrived in Tiraspol, a city which seemed to be lost by civilization, people and modernization. The bus stopped at the railway station (also for buses) and the first thing we did was to ask for the left bus that goes to Chisinau.

Unfortunately, the reaction of the seller from the ticket office wasn’t so kind. I had to ask for three times that I get an uncertain answer. I noticed that on the wall of their booth was suspended the portrait of Smirnov-the transnistrian leader.

We changed money at an exchange and for 100 lei we received 70 transnistrian roubles. While we were looking around, we paid attention at a strange smell that came from the railway station. It was a stench emanated from the train which came from Russia and had a setback at the railway station from Tiraspol.

A lot of people who got out from the train had big teddy bears in their hands-maybe at Moscow they cost cheaper than in Transnistria, who knows?! 🙂

Averting from that stinking place, we decided to see the other part of the city, which had the same traits: old soviet buildings on which were put communist signs, bad roads, silent people-things that make you feel in another country, in another period, as in USSR.

We tried to find supermarket “Sheriff”, but, without luck, we asked the citizens (in Russian, of course!) to tell us where it is.

It’s interesting to know that in Tiraspol “Sheriff” is a common name for a stadium, for a football team, a supermarket, a sort of vodka (and so on), what can that mean?! Well, “Sheriff” is a quite big market, where you can find Russian and Ukrainian products, some of them cheaper than on the other side of river Dniester.

With 70 transnistrian roubles, we bought more than we could buy in Chisinau, with the same money.

It was already murk and we had to turn back to the station, to take the bus.

How we couldn’t receive an amenable answer from the ticket sellers, to know when the bus will come, we waited outside, in cold. We profited for that moment and we ate a bit of salad (bought from “Sheriff”) because we were very hungry.

We cut in with a girl who was waiting, as us the bus. At the beginning we spoke in Russian, but after we found out she knows Romanian, we changed the language. She was born in Tiraspol, but she is studying in Chisinau.

We forgot her name, but we remember she was talkative and positive. After waiting for an hour to appear a bus to take us from there, finally, a white Mercedes minibus, with a drunk driver, came for us.

We gave him 36 lei/person, (the price for a ticket) and we were happy to know that in an hour we will be at home.

We could warm up in that minibus, although near us was sitting a drunken man who believed we were going to Balti. He was stopped at the customs and obligated to pay a mulct. It was funny, because his family didn’t stop to argue him, while he was “high”. At the customs house, we showed that part of inquest which we completed when we entered in Transnistria.

They let us go. In more than one hour we were back in Chisinau. That sensation of old soviet atmosphere continued to rout us, even if we were pretty far from that place. Transnistria seems to be a forgotten place, where the people who live there have a strange way of acting, a strange behavior-always shy, always silent, with the eyes aimed on you.”

1

At the border between Moldova and Transnistria. You can observe "PMR" name.

2

Big agglomeration at the wicket from where you must register yourself to come in Transnistria.

3

Here you are at the border and these blocks are from Tighina (Bendery in russian). Bendery is controlled by PMR.

4

This is a Transnistrian WC from the border. (Transnistrian reek)

5

Some blocks in Tiraspol

6

Other blocks

7

The same soviet style

9

A Sheriff supermarket. Sheriff (in Cyrillic: Шериф) is the second-largest company based in Transnistria.

10

Food and coffee shops

11

Old sovietic blocks

12

The railway station from Tiraspol (Bus station is in the same location).

13

A panel of arrivals and departures from the bus station

14

The map of Transnistria with all roads.

18

Transnistrian roubles

19

Our ticket from Sheriff Supermarket

20

The bus ticket for Chişinău-Tiraspol route (31.90 Moldavian Lei-2 Euro)

21

The necessary inquest for passing in Transnistria. You must pay 22 Moldavian Lei for this.

22

After that,transnistrian policeman will register you. Half from the paper you must keep it with you because you cant leave Transnistria without that paper.

15

Transnistrian auto plate with Tiraspol.

16

Other blocks in sovietic style

17

At Sheriff supermarkets they have a 7% discount for old people.

8

Sheriff supermarket outside.

Comrat (Moldova)

Comrat (Romanian: Comrat; Gagauz: Komrat; Russian: Комрат / Komrat) is a city in Moldova and the capital of the autonomous region of Găgăuzia.

It is located in the south of the country, on the Ialpug River.

 

Karta_Gagauzien

Găgăuzia in Basarabia (Click on the map)

 

In 2004, Comrat’s population was 23,429, of which the vast majority are Gagauzians.

Gagauzia (Gagauz: Gagauziya or Gagauz-Yeri; Romanian: Găgăuzia; Russian: Гагаузия), formally known as the Autonomous Territorial Unit of Găgăuzia (Gagauz Yeri) (Gagauz: Avtonom Territorial Bölümlüü Gagauz Yeri, Romanian: Unitatea Teritorială Autonomă Găgăuzia, Russian: Автономное территориальное образование Гагаузия / Avtonomnoye territorial’noye obrazobaniye), is an autonomous region of Moldova.

The Gagauz people are a small Turkish-speaking ethnic group living mostly in southern Moldova (Gagauzia), southwestern Ukraine (Budjak-southern Basarabia) and north-eastern Bulgaria (Dobruja).

Unlike most other Turkic-speaking peoples, the Gagauzians are predominantly Orthodox Christians.

There is a related ethnic group also called Gagavuz (or Gajal) living in the European part of northwestern Turkey.

Regions with significant populations:

Moldova 147,500
Ukraine 31,900
Greece 30,000
Turkey 15,000
Russia 12,200
Bulgaria 540
Romania 3,000
Kazakhstan 700

Source: Wikipedia

Travel Journal

„…Wishing to visit Gagauzia, we decided, in a rainy vernal morning to have a flying visit to Comrat.

Arriving at the South Station from Chisinau, after we paid 34 lei/person (2.2 euros) for ticket, we took in hurry a minibus with destination Chisinau-Taraclia.

The first thing we have noticed in South was that Moldova has bad roads, it was impossible to stay calm in the bus.

On the way, we remarked that on both sides of the driveway there were a lot of vineyards.

After one and half hours the driver stopped in a very small station, with few buses-we arrived in Comrat.

At the beginning, the city appeared to be uninhabited and old, we saw few people walking on the streets.

After a little walk in the town, we discovered some little shops, which seemed to be forsaken and we found a market place.

We decided to see what are the prices and what do the gagauzians buy from there.

We must confess, even the sellers were fairly polite, we felt a bit uncomfortable because of the people who didn’t stop staring at us. It was strange to see how while you were buying hot peppers you were surrounded by people who were quite smiling at you.

Another thing we have noticed was the big number of pariah dogs which were following you till you didn’t drive them away. Having a walk on the streets of Comrat we saw a lot of old houses and buildings, remained from USSR period.

If you want to ask someone from there about something, we think you should know more languages. Gagauzian people have a strange way of speaking: they use two languages (gagauzian and russian ) at the same time, so it’s difficult to understand them.

After we passed a whole day in Comrat, searching for a place to eat, we came back to the station to take the bus. For this time we paid 36 lei (2.35 euros) for the ticket and we took the last places from a bus.

It was a very old bus, with broken chairs which were moving at the simple flick.

In more than one and half hours we were in Chisinau, tired but pleased that we had seen something different from the usual-an interesting and strange city, Comrat…”

 

Picture 106

A small street from Comrat

 

 

Picture 100

State University from Comrat (Main building)

 

 

Picture 099

Galatsana street near University

 

 

Picture 097

State University from Comrat (A "luxury" building for a city with 23.429 people)

 

 

Picture 095

Assembly of Gagauz-Yeri (Găgăuzia)

 

 

Picture 093

Moldavian and Gagauzian flags on the Assembly of Găgăuzia

 

 

Picture 1099

(Moldavian Bank in Comrat) Moldova Agroindbank

 

 

Picture 107

Periphery street

 

 

Picture 103

City Hall

 

 

Picture 089

Small blocks

 

 

Picture 086

Big blocks in soviet style

 

 

Picture 084

An old communist building

 

 

Picture 080

Other soviet blocks

 

 

Picture 077

Communist blocks

 

 

Picture 074

One of the best highschools from Comrat

 

 

Picture 072

Music school

 

 

Picture 070

Orthodox church (gagauz people are Orthodox)

 

 

Picture 069

Just a street...

 

 

Picture 068

University of Comrat

 

 

Picture 063

I think this is their cultural house

 

 

Picture 060

Lenin...

 

 

Picture 071

Marshutka "маршрутное такси" (маршрутка)

 

 

Picture 057

People's Assembly

 

 

Picture 055

Near to the market

 

 

Picture 053

Shops

 

 

Picture 052

Car plate from Comrat (GE is for Gagauz Eri)

 

 

Picture 050

Old stuffs in bazaar

 

 

Picture 046

A commercial center near to the bazaar

 

 

Picture 044

Fruits on the street

 

 

Picture 042

One of the entrance to bazaar

 

 

Picture 041

Publicity panel

 

 

Picture 040

A nice house

 

 

Picture 038

Gagauzian food 🙂

 

 

Picture 037

Building in construction

 

 

Picture 036

Near to the bus station (avtovokzal)

 

 

Picture 035

New building

 

 

Imag033

Toilet in russian

 

 

Imag031

:))))

 

 

DSC02427

Lenin street

 

 

DSC02411

Inside of Cultural House..i think...

 

 

DSC02424

In the center

 

 

DSC02408

An orchestra singing inside of Cultural House

 

 

DSC02403

The same statue with Lenin

 

 

DSC02396

Gagauzian Disneyland 😀

 

 

DSC02395

Orthodox church

 

 

DSC02394

Gagauzian girl 😛

 

 

DSC02393

The street near to the bazaar

 

 

DSC02391

A nice dog 😛

 

 

DSC02390

Gagauzian beggar "you have any change?" 😦

 

 

DSC02388

In bazaar... (all gagauzians looks at me when i made this photo) weird...

 

 

DSC02387

Gagauzian faces 🙂

 

 

DSC02386

Strawberries

 

 

DSC02440

Gagauzian vane

 

 

Picture 081

Pharmacy (Apteka in Russian)

 

 

Picture 083

Court of Justice from Comrat

 

 

Picture 078

Other typical red blocks...