Tighina (Moldova)

Click on the map for more informations

Click on the map for more informations

Bender, also known as Tighina (Romanian; Russian: Бендеры, Bendery; Ukrainian: Бендери, Bendery) is a city within the internationally recognized borders of Moldova under de facto control of the unrecognized PMR since 1992. Located on the right (western) bank of the river Dniester, together with its suburb Proteagailovca, the city forms a municipality, which is separate from Transnistria according to the Moldovan law. Bender is located in the buffer zone established at the end of the 1992 War of Transnistria.

While the Joint Control Commission has overriding powers in the city, Transnistria has de facto administrative control.

First mentioned in 1408 as Тягянякяча (Tyagyanyakyacha) in a document in Old Slavonic, the town was known in the Middle Ages as Tighina in Moldavian sources and Bender in Ottoman sources. The fortress and the city were called Bender for the most part of the time they were a rayah of the Ottomans (1538-1812), and during most of the time they belonged to the Russian Empires (1828-1917).

They were known as Tighina in the Principality of Moldavia, in the early part of the Russian Empire period (1812-1828), and during the time the city belonged to Romania (1918-1940).

The city is part of the historical region of Bessarabia. During the Soviet period the city was known in the Moldavian SSR as Бендер (Bender) in Moldovan (Romanian) written then with the Cyrillic alphabet, and as Бендéры (Bendery) in Russian. In the independent Moldova, officially it is known as Bender, but otherwise both names Bender and Tighina are used.

Tighina was part of the Moldavian Democratic Republic in 1917-1918, and after 1918, as part of Bessarabia, the city belonged to Romania, where it was the seat of Tighina County.

Along with Bessarabia, the city was occupied by the Soviet Union on June 28, 1940, following an ultimatum. In the course of World War II, it was retaken by Romania in July 1941, and again by the USSR in August 1944.

In 1940-41, and 1941-1991 it was one of the four „republican cities” (i.e. not subordinated to a district) of the Moldavian Soviet Socialist Republic, one of the 15 republics of the Soviet Union. Since 1991, the city is part of the independent Republic of Moldova.

Famous people born in the city include:

Soure: Wikipedia

The train which take us from Chisinau to Tighina (2 hours; 5.60 Moldavian lei is the ticket, almost 0.33 euro)

The train which take us from Chisinau to Tighina (2 hours; 5.60 Moldavian lei is the ticket, almost 0.33 euro)

The train...in Tighina

The train...in Tighina

Inside the train; with old Soviet wooden seats :P

Inside the train; with old Soviet wooden seats 😛

The platform from Tighina railway station (second station in the city)

The platform from Tighina railway station (second station in the city)

1,520 mm (4 ft 11+7⁄8 in) broad gauge or Russian gauge

1,520 mm (4 ft 11+7⁄8 in) broad gauge or Russian gauge

The moldavian cat was not for sale :)

The moldavian cat was not for sale 🙂

Kvass (квас) on the street

Kvass (квас) on the street

YOu can observe the difference between cars :)

You can observe the difference between cars 🙂

Just Lada :P

Just Lada 😛

Last year, Tighina celebrate 600 years of history (1408-2008)

Last year, Tighina celebrate 600 years of history (1408-2008)

Some nice flowers...

Some nice flowers...

Sheriff supermarket

Sheriff supermarket

The intersection from Sheriff supermarket

The intersection from Sheriff supermarket

A bus and trolley

A bus and trolley

An exchange currency panel

An exchange currency panel (26.09.2009)

Commercial centre

Commercial centre

The bazaar

The bazaar

On a walk to the Dniester

On a walk to the Dniester

Some communist blocks with 4 floors

Some communist blocks with 4 floors

A panel with the year of the foundation of Tighina

A panel with the year of the foundation of Tighina

Other communist blocks...

Other communist blocks...

A monument of an Infantry fighting vehicle of the breakaway Transnistrian "army"

A monument of an Infantry fighting vehicle of the breakaway Transnistrian "army"

Other monument

Other monument

A campaign against drugs

A campaign against drugs

The entrance into the city after you cross the bridge from Transnistria

The entrance into the city after you cross the bridge from Transnistria

Joint Control Commission Russian post near to the bridge, in Moldovan side.

Joint Control Commission post near to the bridge, in Moldovan side. Russian troops and vehicle

The railway bridge over the Dniester

The railway bridge over the Dniester

The walls of the fortress build by Stephen the Great and reconstructed by Suleiman the Magnificent

The walls of the fortress build by Stephen the Great and reconstructed by Suleiman the Magnificent

Other photo with the wall...

Other photo with the wall...

Old ship on the Dniester

Old rusty ship on the Dniester

The Dniester (Nistru, Дністер)

The Dniester (Nistru, Дністер)

The bridge over Dniester (just for cars)

The bridge over Dniester (just for cars and tanks)

A sweet cat :P

A sweet cat 😛

Sighişoara (România)

Click on the map for more details

Click on the map for more details

Sighişoara (German: Schäßburg; Hungarian: Segesvár; Latin: Castrum Sex) is a city and municipality on the Târnava Mare River in Mureş County, Romania.

Located in the historic region Transylvania, Sighişoara has a population of 32,287 (2002).

Sights

Sighişoara is a popular tourist destination, due to its well-preserved walled old town. The landmark of the city is the Clock Tower, a 64m high tower built in 1556. It is today a museum of history.

Other interesting sights are:

  • Sighişoara Citadel – a 12th Century Saxon edifice, is the historic center of the city. Still occupied, the citadel is listed as a World Heritage Site.
  • Clock Tower – Built in 1360 and standing at 60 meters tall atop the citadel hill. Inside is a museum that finishes in a great view from the top.
  • Weapon Museum – next to Vlad’s birthplace. Very small, but it contains an interesting selection of medieval weapons (swords, arrows, etc.).
  • Covered Staircase – a very old stone staircase with a wooden roof along the whole span. This leads up to the Church on the Hill and the cemetery.
  • Church on the Hill – contains many frescoes and a crypt. Built on the location of the Roman fort. Close to the cemetery on the side of the hill, which contains many German tombstones.
  • Bust of Vlad Tepes – Located around the corner from his birthplace, within sight of the Clock Tower.

Famous residents

Source: Wikipedia

Orthodox church from the city

Orthodox church from the city

Clock Tower - Built in 1360 and standing at 60 meters tall atop the citadel hill. Inside is a museum that finishes in a great view from the top.

Clock Tower - Built in 1360 and standing at 60 meters tall atop the citadel hill. Inside is a museum that finishes in a great view from the top.

The museum

The museum

A photo from the tower

A photo from the tower

A view with the city

A view with the city

Other view with medieval houses

Other view with medieval houses

The hill inside the citadel

The hill inside the citadel

The best restaurant in the citadel (waiters were wearing medieval clothes)

The best restaurant in the citadel (waiters were wearing medieval clothes)

Church on the Hill - contains many frescoes and a crypt. Built on the location of the Roman fort. Close to the cemetery on the side of the hill, which contains many German tombstones.

Church on the Hill - contains many frescoes and a crypt. Built on the location of the Roman fort. Close to the cemetery on the side of the hill, which contains many German tombstones.

The panel at the entrance into the cemetery

The panel at the entrance into the cemetery

The cemetery

The cemetery

Some crypts

Some crypts

Covered Staircase - a very old stone staircase with a wooden roof along the whole span. This leads up to the Church on the Hill and the cemetery.

Covered Staircase - a very old stone staircase with a wooden roof along the whole span. This leads up to the Church on the Hill and the cemetery.

A good shop with folkloric souvenirs from Transylvania.

A good shop with folkloric souvenirs from Transylvania.

Chernivtsi (Ukraine)

Chernivtsi (Romanian: Cernăuţi; Ukrainian: Чернівці) is the administrative center of Chernivtsi Oblast (province) in western Ukraine.

Chernivtsi on map

Chernivtsi on map

The city lies in the historic Northern Bukovina region and is situated on the Prut river, a tributary of the Danube.

As of the 2001 Ukrainian Census, the city’s population is 240,600.According to the latest All-Ukrainian population census in 2001, the population of Chernivtsi was approximately 236,700 people of 65 nationalities.

Among them, 189,000 (79.8%) are Ukrainians, 26,700 (11.3%) Russians, 10,500 (4.4%) Romanians; 3,800 (1.6%) Moldavians, 1,400 (0.6%) Polish; 1,300 (0.6%) Jews; 2,900 (1.2%) other nationalities.

Based on the last available Soviet data, the population of the city, as of January 1, 1989, was approximately 295,000 residents.

Among these, there are some 172,000 Ukrainians, 46,000 Russians, 16,000 Romanians, 13,000 Moldavians, 7,000 Poles and others. Historically, the city was very multinational. From 1870 to the Second World War, Jews were the biggest population group of Czernowitz.

In 1930, according to the Romanian census, the population of the city was 26.8% Jewish, 23.2% Romanians, 20.8% Germans, 18.6% Ukrainians, and 1.5% Russians.he Romanian population in Chernivtsi started decreasing rapidly after 1950.

Many Romanians fled to Romania or were deported to Siberia (where most of them died), and the remaining Romanian population quickly became a minority and assimilated with the majority.

Nowadays, the Romanian minority in Chernivtsi is still decreasing as a result of cultural assimilation and emigration to Romania.

Source: Wikipedia

Travel Journal

What would be if I will go to Chernivtsi, in Ukraine ?
We took the train from Bucharest to Suceava.

After we arrive in the railway station from Suceava-Burdujeni, we were surprised to admire the railway station that was build in 1869.

After we put our legs in the railway station, an old gypsy man came to us and start to say that Suceava is a dangerous city, and we must have attention because of that and other rubbish (gypsy baloney).

After that, he see that we don’t give him money or something, and he start to say that he needs some money to go at his home, with train.

Can you belive that?

In 2009, someone in European Union could have such momments !

You remember an episode of South Park, called “Night of the Living Homeless“ ? 😛

“Change..Change…you have any change” :)))

After that we escape from the living gypsy, we take the local bus and we go to the centre of the city.A single ticket is 1.5 RON (New Romanian Leu)…almost 0.35 euro-cents.

From the center, we decided to go to the History Museum, to see the throne room of Stephen the Great, the ruler of Moldavian Kingdom between 1457 and 1504.

We take the taxi and we go to the History Museum. The price of taxi in Suceava is 1.80 RON (almost 0.5 Euro).

The museum is good, it has special rooms for all parts of history…start with prehistoric times and ends with WW2.

They also have a good collection of coins, especially medieval moldavian coins from monasteries.

Suceava is not a big city, and we go to the stronghold of the city, which was the capital of Moldavian Kingdom in the time of Stephen the Great.

Up to the hill were the fortress is built, the landscape is amazing, you can see almost all Suceava, and the road from the Mc Donald’s to the stronghold is through forest, simple amazing !

After this walking, we go to the bus station in Suceava and we took the bus for Chernivtsi (2.00 PM). The distance is about 82 km, through the border point Siret in Romania and Porubne in Ukraine.

Before we arrive to the border, we completed an Immigration Card, where we wrote our departure with destination (a hotel), name with surname, citizenship, passport number and our signature.

We didn’t pay anything, we just give the document to the Ukrainian border police and they give us to keep half from the paper. With that half paper you can leave Ukraine, and you must keep it at you.

Before we arrived in Chernivtsi, we pass through Hlyboka (in Romanian is Adâncata), a small Romanian town in Northern Bukovina. The population of Hlyboka District is majority Romanian (51.4 %).

In June 1940, Soviet Union take Northern Bukovina which was eliberated by Romanian Army in 1941.

Romania was forced to give the northern part of Bukovina to the USSR by the 1947 Paris peace treaty. The territory became part of the Ukrainian SSR as Chernivtsi Oblast (province). After the war the Soviet government deported or killed about 41,000 Romanians.

After one and a half hour we arrive to Chernivtsi.

We go to search a bank to buy some UAH with Euro.

The currency was 1 Euro=10 UAH (Ukrainian hryvnia).

With Ukrainian currency, we go to eat and to drink something. We eat at a fasto-food some hamburgers, we drink Kvass (Kbac) and we eat Ukrainian icecream, which is cheaper and good.

With 10 UAH (1 Euro) I eat one big hamburger, one glass of Kvass and one icecream 😀

Can you belive that? 😛

After that, we go for a walk in a park, not so far from the center. We drink some Ukrainian beers and we decided to come back to Romania.

We go to the Central Bus Station (Avtovogzal) and we find a Romanian from Chernivtsi to take us to Suceava. We want to give him some money but he refuse to accept something from us.

We arrive in Suceava at 21.40 and we go to eat and drink,

After that, we go to the railway station to catch the train for Bucharest at 23.04 PM.

The center of Suceava

The center of Suceava

Suceava-Burdujeni railway station

Suceava-Burdujeni railway station

Map of Bukovina

Map of Bukovina

Throne room of Stephen III of Moldavia also known as Stephen the Great (History Museum from Suceava)

Throne room of Stephen III of Moldavia also known as Stephen the Great (History Museum from Suceava)

Solar symbol on a traditional gate near the fortress of Suceava

Solar symbol on a traditional gate near the fortress of Suceava

A great view from the fortress above Suceava

A great view from the fortress above Suceava

Walls of the fortress

Walls of the fortress

On the road from the fortress to the city (through forest).

On the road from the fortress to the city (through forest)

In the bus to Chernivtsi

In the bus to Chernivtsi (old soviet bus)

Timetable in Central Bus Station from Chernivtsi

Timetable in Central Bus Station from Chernivtsi

Central Bus Station from Chernivtsi (Avtovogzal)

Central Bus Station from Chernivtsi (Avtovokzal in ukrainian, Avtovogzal in russian)

Old soviet bus station

Old soviet bus station

Post box

Post box

Local trolleybus from Chernivtsi

Local trolleybus from Chernivtsi

On the road to the centre

On the road to the centre

Law and Order (Ukrainian Police)

Law and Order (Ukrainian Police)

Some nice blocks

Some nice blocks

Plate number from Chernivtsi

Plate number from Chernivtsi

A message to recruting people for sport (Ivan Geshko) Sport-Health-Future

A message to recruting people for sport (Ivan Geshko) Sport-Health-Future

Public phone

Public phone

On this guide panel you can see the name Suceava

On this guide panel you can see the name Suceava

Marshrutnoye taksi or маршрутка (Marshrutka)

Marshrutnoye taksi or маршрутка (Marshrutka)

Kvass (квас) and ukrainian icecream

Kvass (квас) and ukrainian icecream

We saw this ukrainian girl just after we buy some humbergers, she was staying in the front of us

We saw this ukrainian girl just after we buy some humbergers, she was staying in the front of us

a central street in Chernivtsi

A central street in Chernivtsi

Shevchenko Park

Shevchenko Park

Shevchenko Park - A park for Culture and Rest

Shevchenko Park - A park for Culture and Rest

They are still alive !

They are still alive !

Raiffeisen Bank Aval

Raiffeisen Bank Aval

The soviet bus which take us from Suceava to Cernivitsi

The soviet bus which take us from Suceava to Cernivitsi

Ukrainian hryvnia (UAH)

Ukrainian hryvnia (UAH)

A very strong ukrainian beer called Desant (Desant Spetsnaz) 7.2%

A very strong ukrainian beer called Desant (Desant Spetsnaz) 7.2%