Soroca (Moldova)

For bigger size click on the map

Soroca (Russian: Сороки SorokiUkrainian: Сороки SorokyPolishSoroki) is a Moldovan city situated on the Nistru River about 160 km north of Chişinău. It is the administrative center of Soroca District.

The city has its origin in the medieval Genoese trade post of Olchionia, or Alchona. It is known for its well-preserved stronghold, established by theMoldavian Prince Stephen the Great (Ştefan cel Mare in Romanian) in 1499. Its name is derived from the Slavic word for magpie.

The original wooden fort, which defended a ford over the Dniester/Nistru, was an important link in the chain of fortifications which comprised four forts (e.g. Akkerman and Khotin) on the Dniester, two forts on the Danube and three forts on the north border of medieval Moldova. Between 1543 and 1546 under the rule of Petru Rareş, the fortress was rebuilt in stone as a perfect circle with five bastions situated at equal distances.

During the Great Turkish WarJohn Sobieski‘s forces successfully defended the fortress against the Ottomans. It was of vital military importance during the Pruth Campaign of Peter the Great in 1711. The stronghold was sacked by the Russians in the Russo-Turkish War (1735–1739). The Soroca fortress is an important attraction in Soroca, having preserved cultures and kept the old Soroca in the present day.

The locality was greatly extended in the 19th century, during a period of relative prosperity. Soroca became a regional center featuring large squares, modernized streets, hospitals, grammar schools and conventionalized churches. In the Soviet period the town became an important industrial center for northern Moldova.

Source: Wikipedia

Travel journal

After a cold, long winter, without travelling and having new experiences, came the most wanted time for tripping under a big, hot spring sun.

We decided very quickly the new destination of the day: Soroca, a small Moldavian town where is the famous fortress of Stephen the Great of Moldavia- one of the most visited place in Moldova. The morning was sunny and pretty nice, so we had the necessary mood to travel.

We took the bus (in fact, it was a minibus, a very common transport inMoldova) Chișinău-Soroca from the North bus station; the ticket cost 60 lei (4 Euros) and we gave the money directly to the driver. During the itinerary, the driver allowed persons to travel without seats and it was a bit uncomfortable for us (even if we had places to stay) because of the heat form the bus. We traveled almost 2.5 hours by bus; it wasn’t as boring as we thought it would be! Holding hands, we saw beautiful landscapes, nice, Romanian villages with nice people who were carrying for their households. We saw the village of my grandparents and we remembered our childhood when we were staying during our vacations at our grandparents, looking for new adventures.

After we traveled through Telenești County, the road became very bad, in Florești County, it was impossible not to pay attention on it. Finally, after 2.5 hours, we arrived in Soroca and we stopped near to the final station of the buses from the city.

As we were very hungry, we started to look for a restaurant or place to eat. We found one were we ate some tasty Colțunași (пельмени-pelmeni) with cheese which cost 13.5 lei (almost 1 Euro). The next thing we did was to take the bus nr.1 (we paid for 2 tickets 4 lei which means 1 Romanian Leu, almost quarter Euro) which took us in Soroca Nouă (New Soroca)-the part of the city where is situated the Fortress.

After some minutes, we were near the fortress. We were so excited! As we were approaching to it, we noticed a lot of cars and people in front of the fortress. When we entered, we saw a lot of children, women, men and priests present at an Easter challenge, where the participants should sing. It was interesting to watch the show and to see the people’s faces, but we came at Soroca to see the fortress, so we paid more attention on it.

We made a lot of photos, we noticed the well-kept fortress and we tried to imagine how our ancestors were defending this building. Soroca is placed on the shore of river Nistru (on the other side beginsUkraine), so the landscape is fabulous! It’s a bit cold in the region of the fortress because of the water, but this sensation gives you a feeling of power and lordliness.

We had a nice, sweet walk, trying to find the road which takes us to the center of the city. During the stroll, we found a fountain and I asked him to take water out. After killing our thirst, we continued our way, straight to a big monument – Lumânarea Recunoștinței. In the city we saw some restaurants and shops-nothing special, just some places where you can pass the free time in a small city fromMoldova.

Well, if you want to see Lumânarea Recunoștinței’s monument, you may need a car, but if you don’t have it, you can do like us: walk almost 2 Km. We took the direction towards the entrance of the city, and we passed out Soroca. We had a short stoppage on the shore of Nistru, we saw some active fishes in the water, we talked, we made some photos and admired the beautiful landscape. We noticed also the border Moldova-Ukraine which was accessible only for the citizens of Ukraine and Moldova.

         The monument we are talking about is situated at 1 Km from Soroca, at a high of  656 stairs (i counted them!). While climbing the stairs, appears a fantastic view of the Nature: the beautiful forests with the multitude of green nuances of the trees, the road made by Nistru, the multi-millennial rocks. There,at the alttitude, you have the feeling that you’re untouchable, strong and free to do whatever you want. Here you can do an oath, near your love, even it doesn’t have a spiritual ancestral value..

In the interior of the monument, which looks like a candle, you will fiind a little „church” without altar where is possible to keep the marriage ceremony.

After we made some photos, we went back to the city, at the bus station and we took the bus at 6:00 PM (we bought the tickets earlier, when we arrived in the city-just to be sure we’ll have good seats). The driver took persons without tickes, but we weren’t disturbed by that.

 During the way back home (did you see this movie? J) we fell asleep, we talked, or we just were watching through the window and thinking at the day has just passed. In 2.5 hours we were in Chișinău, we stopped at a troleybus station, took the bus and came home tired and hungry.

We went together to bed thinking  the day was nice , the trip was interesting & exciting and we should fiind the next destination of our trip. However, wish we could do more to improve our sensation of good…

Această prezentare necesită JavaScript.

Ungheni (Moldova)

Ungheni (population: 35,157) is the seventh largest city in Moldova and, since 2003, the seat of Ungheni District.

There is a bridge across the Prut and a border checkpoint to Romania. There is another border town with the same name in Romania (Ungheni, Iaşi), on the other side of the Prut River.

1,520 mm (4 ft 11 5⁄6 in) Russian gauge – CIS states (including Russia), Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Mongolia (approx. 17% of the world’s railways)

1,435 mm (4 ft 8 1⁄2 in) Standard gauge – Europe, Argentina, United States, Canada, China, Korea, Australia, Middle East, North Africa, Mexico, Cuba, Panama, Venezuela, Peru, Uruguay and Philippines. Also high-speed lines in Japan and Spain. (approx. 60% of the world’s railways).

Această prezentare necesită JavaScript.

Bălţi (Moldova)

For more informations, click on the map

Bălţi (Polish: Bielce, Russian: Бельцы [Bel’tsy] and Бэлць [Bėlts’], Ukrainian: Бєльці [Byel’tsi], Yiddish: בעלץ [Belts]) is a city in Moldova. It is the second largest in terms of area and economic importance after Chişinău, and the third largest in terms of population after Chişinău and Tiraspol. The city is one of the five Moldovan municipalities. Bălţi, sometimes also called „the northern capital”, is a major industrial, cultural and commercial centre and transportation hub in the north of the country. It is situated 127 kilometres (79 mi) north of the capital Chişinău, and is located on the river Răut, a tributary of the Dniester, on a hilly landscape in the Bălţi steppe.

The word „bălţi” (pl. of Romanian sing. „baltă„) means „swamps”, „puddles”, or „pools”. It is believed that the city had been named thus because it was founded on a hill dominating the wetland formed where the creek Răuţel („Little Răut”) falls into the river Răut.

In addition to the official name Bălţi and the Russian name Бельцы (Beltsy), between 1940-1989 in Moldovan Cyrillic alphabet, and after 1989 in Russian, the name was/is also rendered in Cyrillic as Бэлць.

Theaters:

  • Vasile Alecsandri theatre
  • „Eugene Ionesco” Theatre
  • „Licurici” Republican Puppet Theatre
  • „B.P.Hajdeu” Republican Drama-Muzical Theatre
  • „Mihai Eminescu” National Theatre
  • „Luceafarul” Republican Theatre
  • Municipal Theatre „Satiricus I.L. Caragiale”

Museums and art galleries

  • „Exhibition of the Union of painters „Constantin Brâncuşi”
  • Artum Art Gallery

According to the 2004 Moldovan Census, data submitted by the Department of Statistics and Sociology of the Republic of Moldova, the population of municipality of Bălţi was 127,561, of which the population of the city itself was 122,669, and that of the suburban villages of Elizaveta and Sadovoe was of 3,523, respectively 1,369. Of these, 58,418 were men and 69,143 were women.

Ethnic Groups, 2004:

Ethnicity Number %
Moldovan 66,877 52.4 %
Ukrainian 30,288 23.7 %
Russian 24,526 19.2 %
Romanian 2,258 1.8 %
Pole 862 0.7 %
Jewish 411 0.3 %
Bulgarian 297 0.2 %
Roma 272 0.2 %
Gagauz 243 0.2 %
other 1,527 1.2 %
not declared 183 0.1 %

A info panel with international routes in the bus station of Bălţi

Bus station (Autogară)

A soviet scales 😀

This nice dog diddn't want to eat our plăcinta 😦

The main street near the bus station.We take the bus from here, which goes to the city center

An old soviet trolley

The mayor prepare the city for the date of May 9, when Germany lost the war and sign the surrender act before soviets at Berlin

A street near to the center

Memorial for soviet soldiers from WWII

Mishka (Мишка) mascot from 1980 Summer Olympics in Moscow, Soviet Union

Bălţi-City Station at Moldovan Railway

On the platform of Bălţi-City Station

A guide panel in the center

Decebal street (Decebal was the king of Dacia in the time of wars against romans 101-102,105-106)

We pass on this street when we come from railway station to city center

Theoretical Highschool Mihai Eminescu

In left it was nr 3 🙂

Now it is 589...

A nice XIX century building in the center (i think this is matrimonial palace)

A wedding in the city center

Vasile Alecsandri theatre in the square from the city center with the same name

Cinema Patria (the subtitle is in russian)

A panel with some great citizens from the city

A monument for the holocaust

It says "for the jewish victims killed by fascists in the second world war"

Gogol Theoretical Highschool-School nr. 6 (you can notice the soviet coat of arms up)

A soviet medium tank T-34

A banner with the message "the victory day for the soviet people in the great war for defending the homeland"

A monument of Stefan the Great (2003)

An old Lada car for the Police (Poliţia)

A panel with the train routes in the Bălţi-City Station

Inside the train Moscow-Chişinău (you can notice the curtains with Moldova)

We buy a ticket on platzcart on the route Bălţi-Chişinău with the international train from Moscow. The price for the ticket is 31 moldavian lei, which means 8 romanian lei or 2 euro. (the time of travel is about 3.20 hours because train pass through Ungheni)

Chişinău Zoo

Tighina (Moldova)

Click on the map for more informations

Click on the map for more informations

Bender, also known as Tighina (Romanian; Russian: Бендеры, Bendery; Ukrainian: Бендери, Bendery) is a city within the internationally recognized borders of Moldova under de facto control of the unrecognized PMR since 1992. Located on the right (western) bank of the river Dniester, together with its suburb Proteagailovca, the city forms a municipality, which is separate from Transnistria according to the Moldovan law. Bender is located in the buffer zone established at the end of the 1992 War of Transnistria.

While the Joint Control Commission has overriding powers in the city, Transnistria has de facto administrative control.

First mentioned in 1408 as Тягянякяча (Tyagyanyakyacha) in a document in Old Slavonic, the town was known in the Middle Ages as Tighina in Moldavian sources and Bender in Ottoman sources. The fortress and the city were called Bender for the most part of the time they were a rayah of the Ottomans (1538-1812), and during most of the time they belonged to the Russian Empires (1828-1917).

They were known as Tighina in the Principality of Moldavia, in the early part of the Russian Empire period (1812-1828), and during the time the city belonged to Romania (1918-1940).

The city is part of the historical region of Bessarabia. During the Soviet period the city was known in the Moldavian SSR as Бендер (Bender) in Moldovan (Romanian) written then with the Cyrillic alphabet, and as Бендéры (Bendery) in Russian. In the independent Moldova, officially it is known as Bender, but otherwise both names Bender and Tighina are used.

Tighina was part of the Moldavian Democratic Republic in 1917-1918, and after 1918, as part of Bessarabia, the city belonged to Romania, where it was the seat of Tighina County.

Along with Bessarabia, the city was occupied by the Soviet Union on June 28, 1940, following an ultimatum. In the course of World War II, it was retaken by Romania in July 1941, and again by the USSR in August 1944.

In 1940-41, and 1941-1991 it was one of the four „republican cities” (i.e. not subordinated to a district) of the Moldavian Soviet Socialist Republic, one of the 15 republics of the Soviet Union. Since 1991, the city is part of the independent Republic of Moldova.

Famous people born in the city include:

Soure: Wikipedia

The train which take us from Chisinau to Tighina (2 hours; 5.60 Moldavian lei is the ticket, almost 0.33 euro)

The train which take us from Chisinau to Tighina (2 hours; 5.60 Moldavian lei is the ticket, almost 0.33 euro)

The train...in Tighina

The train...in Tighina

Inside the train; with old Soviet wooden seats :P

Inside the train; with old Soviet wooden seats 😛

The platform from Tighina railway station (second station in the city)

The platform from Tighina railway station (second station in the city)

1,520 mm (4 ft 11+7⁄8 in) broad gauge or Russian gauge

1,520 mm (4 ft 11+7⁄8 in) broad gauge or Russian gauge

The moldavian cat was not for sale :)

The moldavian cat was not for sale 🙂

Kvass (квас) on the street

Kvass (квас) on the street

YOu can observe the difference between cars :)

You can observe the difference between cars 🙂

Just Lada :P

Just Lada 😛

Last year, Tighina celebrate 600 years of history (1408-2008)

Last year, Tighina celebrate 600 years of history (1408-2008)

Some nice flowers...

Some nice flowers...

Sheriff supermarket

Sheriff supermarket

The intersection from Sheriff supermarket

The intersection from Sheriff supermarket

A bus and trolley

A bus and trolley

An exchange currency panel

An exchange currency panel (26.09.2009)

Commercial centre

Commercial centre

The bazaar

The bazaar

On a walk to the Dniester

On a walk to the Dniester

Some communist blocks with 4 floors

Some communist blocks with 4 floors

A panel with the year of the foundation of Tighina

A panel with the year of the foundation of Tighina

Other communist blocks...

Other communist blocks...

A monument of an Infantry fighting vehicle of the breakaway Transnistrian "army"

A monument of an Infantry fighting vehicle of the breakaway Transnistrian "army"

Other monument

Other monument

A campaign against drugs

A campaign against drugs

The entrance into the city after you cross the bridge from Transnistria

The entrance into the city after you cross the bridge from Transnistria

Joint Control Commission Russian post near to the bridge, in Moldovan side.

Joint Control Commission post near to the bridge, in Moldovan side. Russian troops and vehicle

The railway bridge over the Dniester

The railway bridge over the Dniester

The walls of the fortress build by Stephen the Great and reconstructed by Suleiman the Magnificent

The walls of the fortress build by Stephen the Great and reconstructed by Suleiman the Magnificent

Other photo with the wall...

Other photo with the wall...

Old ship on the Dniester

Old rusty ship on the Dniester

The Dniester (Nistru, Дністер)

The Dniester (Nistru, Дністер)

The bridge over Dniester (just for cars)

The bridge over Dniester (just for cars and tanks)

A sweet cat :P

A sweet cat 😛

Chişinău (Moldova)

Chişinău (also known as Kishinev, Russian: Кишинёв Kishinyov), is the capital and largest municipality of Moldova. It is also its main industrial and commercial centre and is located in the middle of the country, on the river Bîc.

For more details click on the map

For more details click on the map

Economically, the city is the most prosperous in Moldova and is one of the main transportation hubs of the region.

As the most important municipality in Moldova, Chişinău has a broad range of educational facilities.

The proportion of green spaces in the city is one of the highest among major European cities.

According to one version, the name comes from the archaic Romanian word chişla (meaning „spring”, „source of water”) and nouă („new”), because it was built around a small spring. Nowadays, the spring is located at the corner of Pushkin and Albişoara streets.

There is another city named Chişineu (alternative spelling: Chişinău) in Western Romania, near the border with Hungary, but its relation to Chişinău is disputed.

Its Hungarian name is Kisjenő (kis „small” + the eponym „Jenő”), from which the Romanian name originates.

Chişinău is also known in Russian as Кишинёв (Kishinyov). It is written Kişinöv in the Latin Gagauz alphabet. It was also written as Кишинэу in the Moldovan Cyrillic alphabet in Soviet times. Historically, the English language name for the city, „Kishinev,” was based on the modified Russian one because it entered the English language via Russian at the time Chişinău was part of the Russian Empire.

Moldova and is administratively subdivided into 32 districts, 2 autonomous units, and 3 municipalities. Chişinău is one of the municipalities.

Besides the city itself, the municipality comprises 34 other suburban localities, and is subdivided into sectors, each comprising a part of the city itself and several suburbs. The municipality in its totality elects a mayor and a local council, which then name 5 pretors, one for each sector.

The five sectors of Chişinău are:

Source: Wikipedia

Near the Arch of Triumph, in the center

Near the Arch of Triumph, in the center

Ministry of Agriculture

Ministry of Agriculture

The presidential palace

The presidential palace (old building, now is in reconstruction after incidents from April 2009)

An old soviet Lada car at the Moldavian Police

An old soviet Lada car at the Moldavian Police

A panel with the message "Chisinau - noi suntem viitorul tau!" put by the mayor of the city, Dorin Chirtoaca

A panel with the message "Chisinau - noi suntem viitorul tau! (We are the future of the Chisinau)" put by the mayor of the city, Dorin Chirtoaca

Parliament

The Parliament of the Republic of Moldova

The statue of Stephen III of Moldavia or Stephen III (c. 1432 - July 2, 1504), also known as Stephen the Great

The statue of Stephen III of Moldavia or Stephen III (c. 1432 - July 2, 1504), also known as Stephen the Great

Theoretical High School (Lyceum) Gheorghe Asachi (The best from Moldova)

Theoretical High School (Lyceum) Gheorghe Asachi (The best from Moldova)

St. Pantelimon Church, 1891

St. Pantelimon Church, 1891

"Malldova" shopping mall (www.shoppingmalldova.md)

Jumbo shopping centre

A poster of the Communist Party of Moldova

A poster of the Communist Party of Moldova

Some prices at webcams (1500 moldavian lei mean almost 400 romanian lei or 95 euro)

Some prices at webcams (1500 moldavian lei mean almost 400 romanian lei or 95 euro)

:)

🙂

:))

:))

The Chisinau Cathedral (19th century Nativity Cathedral of Moldovan Orthodox Church, under Church of Russia)

The Chisinau Cathedral (19th century Nativity Cathedral of Moldovan Orthodox Church, under Church of Russia)

The Chisinau Cathedral

The Chisinau Cathedral

Cathedral’s belfry, restored in 1996

Cathedral’s belfry, restored in 1996

Car plate

Car plate

Free International University of Moldova (ULIM)

Free International University of Moldova (ULIM)

SKYTOWER Business Centre

SKYTOWER Business Centre

Popasul Dacilor restaurant "The stoppage of Dacians"

Popasul Dacilor restaurant "The stoppage of Dacians"

Original wooden style

Original wooden style

The walls are decorated with natural animal skin

The walls are decorated with natural animal skin

The best "barbarian" choice to eat...

The best "barbarian" choice to eat...

Tiraspol (Transnistria)

Tiraspol (Romanian: Tiraspol; Russian: Тирасполь and Ukrainian: Тирасполь) is the second largest city in Moldova and is the capital and administrative centre of the de facto independent Pridnestrovian Moldavian Republic – TransnistriaPMR”).

The city is located on the eastern bank of the Dniester River.

transnistria-harta-gdb-rferl-org

Click on the map

Tiraspol is a regional hub of light industry, such as furniture and electrical goods production.

The toponym consists of two words: Tiras — the ancient Greek name for the Dniester River, and polis – city.

In 1989 the city had a population of about 190,000 and in 1992 203,000. 41% were Russians, 32% Ukrainians and 18% were Moldovans (Romanians).

Sister cities:

2004 Census in Transnistria:

Total population (including Bender): 555,347 (percentages below refer to this first figure)

Total population (minus Bender): 450,337

  • Moldovans (Romanians): 31.9%
  • Russians: 30.3%
  • Ukrainians: 28.8%
  • Bulgarians: 2%
  • Poles: 2%
  • Gagauz: 1.5%
  • Jews: 1.3%
  • Belarusians: 1%
  • Germans: 0.6%
  • Others: 0.5%

Transnistria, also known as Trans-Dniester, Transdniestria, and Pridnestrovie is a disputed region in southeast Europe.

Since its declaration of independence in 1990, followed by the War of Transnistria in 1992, it is governed by the unrecognized Pridnestrovian Moldavian Republic (PMR), which claims the left bank of the river Dniester and the city of Bendery (Tighina) within the former Moldavian SSR.

The modern Republic of Moldova does not recognize the secession and considers PMR-controlled territories to be a part of Moldova’s sovereign territory.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Travel jurnal

„… Many people know about Tiraspol, but few of them had the chance to go there. We were lucky to pass a day on the left side of river Dniester.

From the beginning of the day, we took the bus from the Central station, not before to buy the tickets from a separated ticket office.

It costs 32 lei/person (~3$). After an hour, we arrived at the customs, where we were asked to leave the bus.

A nice woman, who takes care that every passenger passes the frontier, led us to the counter from where we could take an inquest to complete it an official procedure that allow you to pass in Transnistria.

We paid 22 lei/person after we stayed in a big crowd, whereupon the frontier guard gave us a part of the inquest without whom we don’t have the permission to leave Transnistria.

Before that, the persons who aren’t citizens of Republic of Moldova have to register to another wicket, it’s enough to show the passport. We returned at our bus and continued the road till the station of Tiraspol.

The driver stopped in Tighina for few minutes, before we passed through the bridge who rememberd me about the conflict of Transnistria form 1992.At the beginning of the bridge we saw a Russian tanc-a way for showing the power of those who were fighting for “liberty”.

In less than 15 minutes we arrived in Tiraspol, a city which seemed to be lost by civilization, people and modernization. The bus stopped at the railway station (also for buses) and the first thing we did was to ask for the left bus that goes to Chisinau.

Unfortunately, the reaction of the seller from the ticket office wasn’t so kind. I had to ask for three times that I get an uncertain answer. I noticed that on the wall of their booth was suspended the portrait of Smirnov-the transnistrian leader.

We changed money at an exchange and for 100 lei we received 70 transnistrian roubles. While we were looking around, we paid attention at a strange smell that came from the railway station. It was a stench emanated from the train which came from Russia and had a setback at the railway station from Tiraspol.

A lot of people who got out from the train had big teddy bears in their hands-maybe at Moscow they cost cheaper than in Transnistria, who knows?! 🙂

Averting from that stinking place, we decided to see the other part of the city, which had the same traits: old soviet buildings on which were put communist signs, bad roads, silent people-things that make you feel in another country, in another period, as in USSR.

We tried to find supermarket “Sheriff”, but, without luck, we asked the citizens (in Russian, of course!) to tell us where it is.

It’s interesting to know that in Tiraspol “Sheriff” is a common name for a stadium, for a football team, a supermarket, a sort of vodka (and so on), what can that mean?! Well, “Sheriff” is a quite big market, where you can find Russian and Ukrainian products, some of them cheaper than on the other side of river Dniester.

With 70 transnistrian roubles, we bought more than we could buy in Chisinau, with the same money.

It was already murk and we had to turn back to the station, to take the bus.

How we couldn’t receive an amenable answer from the ticket sellers, to know when the bus will come, we waited outside, in cold. We profited for that moment and we ate a bit of salad (bought from “Sheriff”) because we were very hungry.

We cut in with a girl who was waiting, as us the bus. At the beginning we spoke in Russian, but after we found out she knows Romanian, we changed the language. She was born in Tiraspol, but she is studying in Chisinau.

We forgot her name, but we remember she was talkative and positive. After waiting for an hour to appear a bus to take us from there, finally, a white Mercedes minibus, with a drunk driver, came for us.

We gave him 36 lei/person, (the price for a ticket) and we were happy to know that in an hour we will be at home.

We could warm up in that minibus, although near us was sitting a drunken man who believed we were going to Balti. He was stopped at the customs and obligated to pay a mulct. It was funny, because his family didn’t stop to argue him, while he was “high”. At the customs house, we showed that part of inquest which we completed when we entered in Transnistria.

They let us go. In more than one hour we were back in Chisinau. That sensation of old soviet atmosphere continued to rout us, even if we were pretty far from that place. Transnistria seems to be a forgotten place, where the people who live there have a strange way of acting, a strange behavior-always shy, always silent, with the eyes aimed on you.”

1

At the border between Moldova and Transnistria. You can observe "PMR" name.

2

Big agglomeration at the wicket from where you must register yourself to come in Transnistria.

3

Here you are at the border and these blocks are from Tighina (Bendery in russian). Bendery is controlled by PMR.

4

This is a Transnistrian WC from the border. (Transnistrian reek)

5

Some blocks in Tiraspol

6

Other blocks

7

The same soviet style

9

A Sheriff supermarket. Sheriff (in Cyrillic: Шериф) is the second-largest company based in Transnistria.

10

Food and coffee shops

11

Old sovietic blocks

12

The railway station from Tiraspol (Bus station is in the same location).

13

A panel of arrivals and departures from the bus station

14

The map of Transnistria with all roads.

18

Transnistrian roubles

19

Our ticket from Sheriff Supermarket

20

The bus ticket for Chişinău-Tiraspol route (31.90 Moldavian Lei-2 Euro)

21

The necessary inquest for passing in Transnistria. You must pay 22 Moldavian Lei for this.

22

After that,transnistrian policeman will register you. Half from the paper you must keep it with you because you cant leave Transnistria without that paper.

15

Transnistrian auto plate with Tiraspol.

16

Other blocks in sovietic style

17

At Sheriff supermarkets they have a 7% discount for old people.

8

Sheriff supermarket outside.