Oświęcim (Poland)

Oświęcim, Lesser Poland Voivodeship (German: Auschwitz, Yiddish Oshpitsin אָשפּיצין, Romany: Aushvitsa, Osvyenchim, Czech: Osvětim, Slovak: Osvienčim, Russian: Освенцим) is a town in southern Poland, situated 50 kilometres (31 mi) west of Kraków, near the confluence of the rivers Vistula (Wisła) and Soła.

Click on the map for more informations about Oświęcim

Click on the map for more informations about Oświęcim

The town became part of the Lesser Poland Voivodeship in 1998 after previously being in the Bielsko-Biała Voivodeship since 1975.

The three main camps were Auschwitz I, II (Birkenau), and III (Monowitz).

Auschwitz I, the original concentration camp, served as the administrative center for the whole complex, and was the site of the deaths of roughly 70,000 people, mostly ethnic Poles and Soviet prisoners of war.

Auschwitz-Birkenau (Konzentrationslager Auschwitz) was the largest of Nazi Germany’s concentration camps, established in Nazi German occupied Poland.

The camp took its German name from the nearby Polish town of Oświęcim.

Birkenau, the German translation of pol. Brzezinka (birch tree), refers to a small village nearby, mostly destroyed by the Germans.

Following the German invasion of Poland in September 1939, Oświęcim was annexed by Nazi Germany and renamed Auschwitz, the town’s German name.

The surrounding work camps, of which there were approximately forty, were closely connected to German industry and were associated with arms factories, foundries and mines. The largest work camp was Auschwitz III Monowitz, named after the Polish village of Monowice.

Auschwitz I

Auschwitz II (Birkenau)

Auschwitz III (Monowitz)

Source: Wikipedia


A guide panel in the center of Oświęcim

A guide panel in the center of Oświęcim

Inside of Auschwitz I (the original camp)

Inside of Auschwitz I (the original camp)

Blocks from Auschwitz I

Blocks from Auschwitz I

Road through barracks from Auschwitz II (Birkenau)

Road through barracks from Auschwitz II (Birkenau)

Some remained barracks from Auschwitz II (Birkenau). The majority were destroyed by allies

Some remained barracks from Auschwitz II (Birkenau). The majority were destroyed by allies

A panel with prisoneers when they enter to the camp

A panel with prisoneers when they enter to the camp

Crematorium from Auschwitz I

Crematorium from Auschwitz I

The main road from Auschwitz I

The main road from Auschwitz I

The swimming pool from Auschwitz I, made for prisoneers

The swimming pool from Auschwitz I, made for prisoneers

Bunk beds in the Auschwitz I

Bunk beds in the Auschwitz I

Stuffs in Auschwitz I

Stuffs in Auschwitz I

Blocks in Bunk Auschwitz I

Blocks in Bunk Auschwitz I

Preserved blocks from Auschwitz I

Preserved blocks from Auschwitz I

Near to the entrance of Auschwitz I (Arbeit macht frei "work brings freedom" or "work shall set you free/will free you" or "work liberates" and, literally in English, "work makes (one) free")

Near to the entrance of Auschwitz I (Arbeit macht frei "work brings freedom" or "work shall set you free/will free you" or "work liberates" and, literally in English, "work makes (one) free")

Near to the entrance in Auschwitz I

Near to the entrance in Auschwitz I

Before to the entrance in Auschwitz I

Before to the entrance in Auschwitz I

The parking near to the entrance of Auschwitz I Museum

The parking near to the entrance of Auschwitz I Museum

Catholic church in the center of Oświęcim (Old Market Square-Rynek Główny)

Catholic church in the center of Oświęcim (Old Market Square-Rynek Główny)

The Central Sauna in Auschwitz II Birkenau

The Central Sauna in Auschwitz II Birkenau

International monuments in Auschwitz II Birkenau

International monuments in Auschwitz II Birkenau

Jewish candles

Jewish candles

The main gates from the entrance to the Auschwitz II Birkenau

The main gates from the entrance to the Auschwitz II Birkenau

Kraków (Poland)

Kraków (Krakow or Cracow) is one of the largest and oldest cities in Poland, and is a popular tourist location, containing a World Heritage Site in the historic centre.

Situated on the Vistula river (Polish: Wisła) in the Lesser Poland region, the city dates back to the 7th century. Kraków has traditionally been one of the leading centres of Polish academic, cultural and artistic life, and is one of Poland’s most important economic centres.

It was the capital of Poland from 1038 to 1596, the capital of the Grand Duchy of Kraków from 1846 to 1918, and the capital of Kraków Voivodeship from the 14th century to 1999.

It is now the capital of the Lesser Poland Voivodeship.

The city has grown from a Stone Age settlement to Poland’s second most important city. It has grown out from a hamlet on Wawel Hill, and was reported as a busy trading centre of Slavonic Europe in 965.

With the emergence of the Second Polish Republic, Kraków restored its role as a major academic and cultural centre with the establishment of new universities.

Source: Wikipedia

Souvenirs inside of Sukiennice (Cloth Hall) in Main Market Square

Souvenirs inside of Sukiennice (Cloth Hall) in Main Market Square

A big wheel

A big wheel

Neo-Gothic chapel of Blessed Bronisława erected by the Austrian authorities in 1856-1861 inside the citadel surrounding the Kościuszko Mound in the Zwierzyniec district of Kraków

Neo-Gothic chapel of Blessed Bronisława erected by the Austrian authorities in 1856-1861 inside the citadel surrounding the Kościuszko Mound in the Zwierzyniec district of Kraków

At the top of Kościuszko Mound (Kopiec Kościuszki) 326 metres (1,070 ft) above sea level, with a panoramic view of the Vistula River and the city

At the top of Kościuszko Mound (Kopiec Kościuszki) 326 metres (1,070 ft) above sea level, with a panoramic view of the Vistula River and the city

Other view from Kościuszko Mound

Other view from Kościuszko Mound

Other view

Other view

Restaurant

Restaurant

A panel with the history of the Mound

A panel with the history of the Mound

Flow canal

Flow canal

On the road to the top...

On the road to the top...

Kościuszko Mound, Kraków. Note the group of visitors atop the upper brick wall (extreme left) for actual scale

Note the group of visitors atop the upper brick wall (extreme left) for actual scale

A Polish cannon

A Polish cannon

In the car, on the road to the centre

In the car, on the road to the centre

A nice street near to the Main Market Square, in the center of Kraków

A nice street near to the Main Market Square, in the center of Kraków