Bălţi (Moldova)

For more informations, click on the map

Bălţi (Polish: Bielce, Russian: Бельцы [Bel’tsy] and Бэлць [Bėlts’], Ukrainian: Бєльці [Byel’tsi], Yiddish: בעלץ [Belts]) is a city in Moldova. It is the second largest in terms of area and economic importance after Chişinău, and the third largest in terms of population after Chişinău and Tiraspol. The city is one of the five Moldovan municipalities. Bălţi, sometimes also called „the northern capital”, is a major industrial, cultural and commercial centre and transportation hub in the north of the country. It is situated 127 kilometres (79 mi) north of the capital Chişinău, and is located on the river Răut, a tributary of the Dniester, on a hilly landscape in the Bălţi steppe.

The word „bălţi” (pl. of Romanian sing. „baltă„) means „swamps”, „puddles”, or „pools”. It is believed that the city had been named thus because it was founded on a hill dominating the wetland formed where the creek Răuţel („Little Răut”) falls into the river Răut.

In addition to the official name Bălţi and the Russian name Бельцы (Beltsy), between 1940-1989 in Moldovan Cyrillic alphabet, and after 1989 in Russian, the name was/is also rendered in Cyrillic as Бэлць.

Theaters:

  • Vasile Alecsandri theatre
  • „Eugene Ionesco” Theatre
  • „Licurici” Republican Puppet Theatre
  • „B.P.Hajdeu” Republican Drama-Muzical Theatre
  • „Mihai Eminescu” National Theatre
  • „Luceafarul” Republican Theatre
  • Municipal Theatre „Satiricus I.L. Caragiale”

Museums and art galleries

  • „Exhibition of the Union of painters „Constantin Brâncuşi”
  • Artum Art Gallery

According to the 2004 Moldovan Census, data submitted by the Department of Statistics and Sociology of the Republic of Moldova, the population of municipality of Bălţi was 127,561, of which the population of the city itself was 122,669, and that of the suburban villages of Elizaveta and Sadovoe was of 3,523, respectively 1,369. Of these, 58,418 were men and 69,143 were women.

Ethnic Groups, 2004:

Ethnicity Number %
Moldovan 66,877 52.4 %
Ukrainian 30,288 23.7 %
Russian 24,526 19.2 %
Romanian 2,258 1.8 %
Pole 862 0.7 %
Jewish 411 0.3 %
Bulgarian 297 0.2 %
Roma 272 0.2 %
Gagauz 243 0.2 %
other 1,527 1.2 %
not declared 183 0.1 %

A info panel with international routes in the bus station of Bălţi

Bus station (Autogară)

A soviet scales 😀

This nice dog diddn't want to eat our plăcinta 😦

The main street near the bus station.We take the bus from here, which goes to the city center

An old soviet trolley

The mayor prepare the city for the date of May 9, when Germany lost the war and sign the surrender act before soviets at Berlin

A street near to the center

Memorial for soviet soldiers from WWII

Mishka (Мишка) mascot from 1980 Summer Olympics in Moscow, Soviet Union

Bălţi-City Station at Moldovan Railway

On the platform of Bălţi-City Station

A guide panel in the center

Decebal street (Decebal was the king of Dacia in the time of wars against romans 101-102,105-106)

We pass on this street when we come from railway station to city center

Theoretical Highschool Mihai Eminescu

In left it was nr 3 🙂

Now it is 589...

A nice XIX century building in the center (i think this is matrimonial palace)

A wedding in the city center

Vasile Alecsandri theatre in the square from the city center with the same name

Cinema Patria (the subtitle is in russian)

A panel with some great citizens from the city

A monument for the holocaust

It says "for the jewish victims killed by fascists in the second world war"

Gogol Theoretical Highschool-School nr. 6 (you can notice the soviet coat of arms up)

A soviet medium tank T-34

A banner with the message "the victory day for the soviet people in the great war for defending the homeland"

A monument of Stefan the Great (2003)

An old Lada car for the Police (Poliţia)

A panel with the train routes in the Bălţi-City Station

Inside the train Moscow-Chişinău (you can notice the curtains with Moldova)

We buy a ticket on platzcart on the route Bălţi-Chişinău with the international train from Moscow. The price for the ticket is 31 moldavian lei, which means 8 romanian lei or 2 euro. (the time of travel is about 3.20 hours because train pass through Ungheni)

Reclame

Odessa (Ukraine)

For more details click on the map

For more details click on the map

Odessa or Odesa (Ukrainian: Одеса; Russian: Одесса; Romanian: Odesa; Greek: Οδησσός; Yiddish: אדעס) is the administrative center of the Odessa Oblast (province) located in southern Ukraine. The city is a major seaport located on the shore of the Black Sea and the fourth largest city in Ukraine with a population of 1,029,000 (as of the 2001 census).

Odessa was founded by Hacı I Giray, the Khan of Crimea, in 1240 and originally named Khadjibey after him. After a period of Lithuanian control, it passed into the domain of the Ottoman Sultan in 1529 and remained in Ottoman hands until the Ottoman Empire’s defeat in the Russo-Turkish War of 1792.

The Russians renamed the city Odessa in 1794. From 1819–1858 Odessa was a free port. During the Soviet period it was the most important port of trade in the Soviet Union and a Soviet naval base. On January 1, 2000 the Quarantine Pier of Odessa trade sea port was declared a free port and free economic zone for a term of 25 years.

In the 19th century it was the fourth largest city of Imperial Russia, after Moscow, Saint Petersburg, and Warsaw. Its historical architecture has a style more Mediterranean than Russian, having been heavily influenced by French and Italian styles. Some buildings are built in a mixture of different styles, including Art Nouveau, Renaissance and Classicist.

Following the Bolshevik Revolution in 1917 during World War I, Odessa was occupied by several groups, including the Ukrainian Tsentral’na Rada, the French Army, the Red Army and the White Army. Finally, in 1920, the Red Army took control of Odessa and united it with the Ukrainian SSR, which later became part of the USSR.

During World War II, from 1941–1944, Odessa was subject to Romanian administration, as the city had been made part of the Transnistria occupation district. Romanians used the name ‘Odessa’ as the Ukrainian version of the city. The Romanian occupation may be described a „soft one” compared to the short period of German occupation in 1944.

The Romanian commanding General made an unofficial armistice with the partisans hidden in the city’s catacombs, who in turn did not mount much resistance to the Romanians.

When the people of Odessa suffered from hunger, the Romanians transported grain from Bessarabia to Odessa in 1942 and 1943. It is told that the Romanians imported the best cognac and wines, in addition to two train loads of the best French food in 1942 to the restaurants of Odessa, from France.

During the April 1944 battle Odessa suffered severe damage and many casualties. Many parts of Odessa were damaged during its siege and recapture on 10 April 1944, when the city was finally liberated by the Red Army.

Following the Siege of Odessa, and the Axis occupation, approximately 25,000 Odessans (mostly Jews) were murdered and over 35,000 deported. Most of the atrocities were committed during the first six months of the occupation which officially begun on 17 October 1941, after the bombing of the Romanian HQ and the subsequent brutal response of the Romanian military.

After this time period, the Romanian administration changed its policy, refusing to deport the remaining Jewish population to extermination camps in German occupied Poland, and allowing Jews to work as hired labourers. As a result, despite the tragic events of 1941, the survival of the Jews in this area was higher than in other areas of occupied Europe.

Source: Wikipedia

Travel journal

If you are in Chisinau and you want to arrive in Odessa, the best idea is to get a vehicle –a bus from North Station (near Calea Basarabiei market).

So we did.

At 07.30 we took the first bus which goes to Odessa and we paid for a ticket 93 Moldavian lei (it means 5.8 euros). The bus-driver gave us an inquest to complete for entering in Ukraine.

A half of this inquest you give when you come in the country and another one when you leave it. We passed the customs very quickly, without problems and in 4-5 hours we arrived in Odessa.

As we didn’t have a map for orientation, we started to ask people how to arrive to Potemkin Stairs, which was our first visit. Honestly, we tell you, you must be patient with Ukrainian people because how many people you ask, you will receive different contradictory answers to arrive at the place you need 🙂

In this way, we took the trolley number 5, we paid for the ticket 1 grivna (0.08 euros) and after 4 stations we were on Tiraspol’skaya Street. We walked for other 15 minutes among some nice old buildings and we arrived at the Poteomkin Stairs.

By the way, the streets from Odessa are very nice in autumn :P.

We visited the Passage from Odessa which impressed us very much by its architecture. We have to recognize the prices from those shops were pretty high. On the streets, we saw a lot of expensive bars, restaurants and pubs, but interesting arranged, however, with few clients.

From the beginning, we were a bit disappointed a cause of those stairs-we thought it would be more imposing, but it looked like some usually stairs. From the right side, there was a funicular which leave you down, at the beginning of the stairs.

Sincerely, we don’t see the meaning of this funicular because the distance is not so long, it’s only 142 meters you can descend in 2 minutes!

A funny moment was when we had to split thousands of balloons threw from the roof of a building-people from Odessa celebrated the inauguration of a shopping center. It was nice to see people of all ages doing a thing that gave them a smile on theirs faces.

If you are in Ukraine, it is impossible to not respect the tradition- we bought beer and dry salt fish! How the harbour was near, we had a freezing walk on the promenade; the sea was not so hospitable with us.

At half past 5 we had to take the bus to return in Chisinau so we had to hurry to arrive at the bus station. We had the same problem: all people we asked what trolley we must take gave us different answers, but in the end we arrived to the final destination. 😛

From the bus station we bought some carrot pies (3.5 griva=0.25 euros each pie). The ticket price Odessa-Chisinau was 53 grivnas/person (equal 4 euros). At the customs; we gave the second part of that inquest we completed before we entered in Ukraine and in 4 hours we were in Chisinau.

Odessa seemed us to be a nice, pretty big city, with a lot of interesting places to visit, however, better in summer 😉

Bus station (Avtovokzal)

Bus station (Avtovokzal)

A kiosk with all kind of crumpets, just near to bus station

A kiosk with all kind of crumpets, just near to bus station

A soviet block

A soviet block

A very width tram

A very width tram (the ticket is 1 UAH which means 0.08 EURO)

Just a photo from the center, with ukrainian yellow marshutka

Just a photo from the center, with ukrainian yellow marshrutka

A bus...

A bus...

A nice building, with Cuba Cafe Bar

A nice building, with Cuba Cafe

Paved road in the old center

Paved road in the old center

Trolley...

Trolley...

Old center (the road to harbour)

Old center (the road to harbour)

DE TRADUS

Military of Ukraine (Southern forces)

Real hypermarket

Real hypermarket

You can observe the colour of the bars (Ukrainian flag)

You can observe the colour of the bars (Ukrainian flag)

I think this is Preobrazhenskiy Cathedral from Sobornaya Square

I think this is Preobrazhenskiy Cathedral from Sobornaya Square

Beeline mobile phone company from Russia and life:), Kyivstar, Golden Telecom and MTS from Ukraine

Beeline mobile phone company from Russia and life:), Kyivstar, Golden Telecom and MTS from Ukraine

The Passage from Odessa (1899) with baroque style

The Passage from Odessa (1899) "baroque style"

Built in 1899, by polish architect Lev Vlodek, the passage belonged to the merchant Mendelevich. Now, passage is one of the lare largest auction centers in Odessa

Built in 1899, by polish architect Lev Vlodek, the passage belonged to the merchant Mendelevich. Now, passage is one of the lare largest auction centers in Odessa

McDonald's

McDonald's

An exchange panel

An exchange panel

This is the monument of the founders of the city, build in 1900, restored in 2007

This is the monument of the founders of the city, build in 1900, restored in 2007

Nice buildings...

Nice buildings...

That was near to the Potemkin Stairs

That was near to the Potemkin Stairs

The 142-metre-long Potemkin Stairs

The 142-metre-long Potemkin Stairs

Slavic style :)

Slavic style 🙂

Wedding near to the Black Sea :P

Wedding near to the Black Sea 😛

The Potemkin Stairs were constructed between 1837–1841

The Potemkin Stairs were constructed between 1837–1841

Hair for all Ukraine from Yulia Volodymyrivna Tymoshenko (Ukrainian: Юлія Володимирівна Тимошенко), the Prime Minister of Ukraine

Hair for all Ukraine from Yulia Volodymyrivna Tymoshenko (Ukrainian: Юлія Володимирівна Тимошенко), the Prime Minister of Ukraine 🙂

In Kiev the machine is cheaper :)

In Kiev is cheaper 🙂

Trains near to the Odessa Harbour

Trains near to the Odessa Harbour

I love you, my Odessa :P

I love you, my Odessa 😛

The highway from the harbour

The highway from the harbour

An info panel at the harbour

An info panel at the harbour

An ukrainian vessel

An ukrainian vessel

Other vessels

Other vessels

Hotel Odessa on the Black Sea, just near to the harbour

Hotel Odessa on the Black Sea, just near to the harbour

UKRFERRY "Caledonia" which can take you to Istanbul :P

UKRFERRY "Caledonia" which can take you to Istanbul 😛

Lenin is alive :(

Lenin is alive 😦

A cute ukrainian cat :)

A cute ukrainian cat 😛

Public phone cabin

Public phone cabin

A panel with the condition of weather in the Bus station

A panel with the condition of weather in the Bus station

Kiev (Ukraine)

For more informations, click on the map

For more informations, click on the map

Kiev or Kyiv (Ukrainian: Київ), is the capital and the largest city of Ukraine, located in the north central part of the country on the Dnieper River.

The population as of the 2001 census was 2,611,300. However, higher numbers have been cited in the press.

Kiev is an important industrial, scientific, educational and cultural centre of Eastern Europe. It is home to many high-tech industries, higher education institutions and world-famous historical landmarks.

The city has an extensive infrastructure and highly developed system of public transport, including the Kiev Metro.

The name Kiev is said to derive from the name of Kyi, one of four legendary founders of the city (brothers Kyi, Shchek, Khoryv and sister Lybid’). During its history, Kiev, one of the oldest cities in Eastern Europe, passed through several stages of great prominence and relative obscurity.

The city may have been founded in the 5th century as a trading post, perhaps part of the land of the early Slavs. It gradually acquired eminence as the centre of the East Slavic civilization, becoming in the tenth to twelfth centuries a political and cultural capital of Rus’, a medieval East Slavic state.

Completely destroyed during the Mongol invasion in 1240, the city lost most of its influence for the centuries to come. It was a provincial capital of marginal importance in the outskirts of the territories controlled by its powerful neighbors: first the Grand Duchy of Lithuania, followed by Poland and Russia.

The city prospered again during the Russian industrial revolution in the late 19th century. After the turbulent period following the Russian Revolution of 1917, from 1921 onwards Kiev was an important city of the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic, and, from 1934, its capital.

During World War II, the city again suffered significant damage, but quickly recovered in the post-war years remaining the third largest city of the Soviet Union. Following the collapse of the Soviet Union and the Ukrainian independence of 1991, Kiev remained the capital of Ukraine.

Source: Wikipedia

The first photo which i made outside of Kiev Railway Station :)

The first photo which i made outside of Kiev Railway Station 🙂

Kiev Passenger Railway Station (Ukrainian: "Київ-Пасажирський", Kyiv-Passazhyrs’kyi)

Kiev Passenger Railway Station (Ukrainian: "Київ-Пасажирський", Kyiv-Passazhyrs’kyi)

Vokzalna (Ukrainian: Вокзальна, Russian: Вокзальная,Vokzalnaya) is a station on Kiev Metro's Sviatoshynsko-Brovarska Line

Vokzalna (Ukrainian: Вокзальна, Russian: Вокзальная,Vokzalnaya) is a station on Kiev Metro's Sviatoshynsko-Brovarska Line

Inside of Vokzalna

Inside of Vokzalna

Dnieper River

Dnieper River

Some nice ducks on the river

Some nice ducks on the river

Waterlillies (Nymphaea)

Waterlillies (Nymphaea)

Mailbox (Поштa)

Mailbox (Поштa)

Watermelons from Kherson (Ukrainian and Russian: Херсон)

Watermelons from Kherson (Херсон)

Livoberezhna metro station

Livoberezhna metro station (Ukrainian: Лівобережна, Russian: Левобережная, Levoberezhnaya)

Metrowagonmash subway train (Russian: ОАО "Метровагонмаш")

Metrowagonmash subway train (Russian: ОАО "Метровагонмаш")

Arsenalna metro station is the deepest station in the world (102 metres)

Arsenalna metro station is the deepest station in the world (102 metres)

solar

Ukrainian Super Turbo Solar 🙂

monument comunist

Soviet monument near Arsenalna subway station

patriarch

A support message for Ukraine and Ukrainians from Patriarch Kirill I, or Cyril I, the Patriarch of Moscow and All Rus and Primate of the Russian Orthodox Church since February 1, 2009.

Gate Church of the Trinity (Pechersk Lavra)

Gate Church of the Trinity (Pechersk Lavra)

Great Lavra Belltower (Ukrainian: Велика Лаврська дзвіниця, Russian: Большая Лаврская колокольня)

Great Lavra Belltower (Ukrainian: Велика Лаврська дзвіниця, Russian: Большая Лаврская колокольня)

The guide panel from the entrance to the complex

The guide panel from the entrance to the complex

Kiev Pechersk Lavra (Ukrainian: Києво-Печерська лавра, Kyievo-Pechers’ka lavra; Russian: Киево-Печерская лавра, Kievo-Pecherskaya lavra), also known as the Kiev Monastery of the Caves, is a historic Orthodox Christian monastery in Kiev, Ukraine. Since its foundation as the cave monastery in 1015.

Kiev Pechersk Lavra (Ukrainian: Києво-Печерська лавра, Kyievo-Pechers’ka lavra; Russian: Киево-Печерская лавра, Kievo-Pecherskaya lavra), also known as the Kiev Monastery of the Caves, is a historic Orthodox Christian monastery in Kiev, Ukraine. Since its foundation as the cave monastery in 1015.

The same Cathedral

From close distance

The same Cathedral (Cathedral of the Dormition)

The same Cathedral (Cathedral of the Dormition)

The Dormition Cathedral was destroyed in World War II and reconstructed

The Dormition Cathedral was destroyed in World War II and reconstructed

Other photo with the Cathedral

Other photo with the Cathedral

The tunnel with Christian souvenirs

The tunnel with Christian souvenirs

Other popular souvenirs

Other popular souvenirs

A view from the back of the Cathedral

A view from the back of the Cathedral

This beautiful street is full of honey products

This beautiful street is full of honey products

A graffito with Dinamo Kiev footbal team (Ukrainian: ФК Динамо Київ, FK Dynamo Kyyiv)

A graffito with Dinamo Kiev footbal team (Ukrainian: ФК Динамо Київ, FK Dynamo Kyyiv)

A subway tunnel of Kiev Metro

A subway tunnel of Kiev Metro

Poshtova Ploshcha subway station (Ukrainian: Поштова площа; Russian: Почтовая площадь, Pochtovaya ploschad)

Poshtova Ploshcha subway station (Ukrainian: Поштова площа; Russian: Почтовая площадь, Pochtovaya ploschad)

The entrance to the station

The entrance to the station

Kiev funicular ((Ukrainian: Київський фунікулер, Russian: Киевский фуникулёр). Wheel width: 100 cm. Total track length: 238 meters.

Kiev funicular ((Ukrainian: Київський фунікулер, Russian: Киевский фуникулёр). Wheel width: 100 cm. Total track length: 238 meters.

The wagon from funicular

The wagon from funicular

The system's two track sidings

The system's two track sidings

Inside of wagon

Inside of wagon

The Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Ukraine (Ukrainian: Міністерство закордонних справ України).

The Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Ukraine (Ukrainian: Міністерство закордонних справ України).

Saint Sophia Cathedral in Kiev (Собор Святої Софії); XII century

Saint Sophia Cathedral in Kiev (Собор Святої Софії); XI century

The statue of Bohdan Khmelnytsky in front of the Saint Sophia Cathedral in Kiev, Ukraine.

The statue of Bohdan Khmelnytsky in front of the Saint Sophia Cathedral in Kiev, Ukraine.

Patriarch Volodymyr (Romaniuk) (Romaniuk Vasiliy Emelianovitch) (1925 – July 14, 1995) was the Patriarch of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church - Kiev Patriarchy from 1993 to 1995.

The grave of Patriarch Volodymyr (Romaniuk) (Romaniuk Vasiliy Emelianovitch) (1925 – July 14, 1995) was the Patriarch of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church - Kiev Patriarchy from 1993 to 1995.

Souvenir penny in the garden of Saint Sophia Cathedral :)

Souvenir Penny in the garden of Saint Sophia Cathedral 🙂

The panel from the entrance with prices for visitors and program

The panel from the entrance with prices for visitors and program

The belltower of the Saint Sophia

The belltower of the Saint Sophia

Inside of the belltower

Inside of belltower

Other view of the Cathedral

Other view of the Cathedral

National History Museum of Ukraine

National History Museum of Ukraine

Other graffito with Dinamo Kiev near to Lobanovsky Dynamo Stadium

Other graffito with Dinamo Kiev near to Lobanovsky Dynamo Stadium

The Verkhovna Rada of Ukraine (Ukrainian: Верховна Рада України; English: Supreme Council of Ukraine) is Ukraine's parliament.

The Verkhovna Rada of Ukraine (Ukrainian: Верховна Рада України; English: Supreme Council of Ukraine) is Ukraine's parliament.

Dacia car in Kiev :)

Dacia car in Kiev 🙂

House with Chimaeras or Gorodetsky House (Ukrainian: Будинок з химерами)

House with Chimaeras or Gorodetsky House (Ukrainian: Будинок з химерами)

The building of the Presidential Secretariat is near to the House with Chimaeras

The building of the Presidential Secretariat is near to the House with Chimaeras

Khreshchatyk subway station of Kiev Metro

Khreshchatyk subway station of Kiev Metro

I made this photo near to the Independence Square

I made this photo near to the Independence Square

The monument of Berehynia from Independence Square "Maidan Nezalezhnosti" (Ukrainian: Майдан Незалежності

The monument of Berehynia from Independence Square "Maidan Nezalezhnosti" (Ukrainian: Майдан Незалежності

The base of monument

The base of monument

Hotel Ukraina (Ukrainian: Готель Україна; Russian: Гостиница Украина) from the Independence Square

Hotel Ukraina (Ukrainian: Готель Україна; Russian: Гостиница Украина) from the Independence Square

Flood in Independence Square :)

Flood in Independence Square 🙂

The Golden Gate of Kiev (Ukrainian: Золоті ворота, Zoloti vorota) constructed by Yaroslav the Wise (c. 978 in Kiev - February 20, 1054 in Kiev)

The Golden Gate of Kiev (Ukrainian: Золоті ворота, Zoloti vorota) constructed by Yaroslav the Wise (c. 978 in Kiev - February 20, 1054 in Kiev)

The monument from the The Ukrainian National Chernobyl Museum (Ukrainian: Українськии національний музей "Чорнобиль")

The monument from the The Ukrainian National Chernobyl Museum (Ukrainian: Українськии національний музей "Чорнобиль")

The panel from the entrance

The panel from the entrance

A device for measure the level of radiation into the museum

A device for measure the level of radiation into the museum

Map of radioactive contamination of animals

Map of radioactive contamination of animals

A sculpture devoted to memory of the helicopter's Mi-8 crew

A sculpture devoted to memory of the helicopter's Mil Mi-8 crew

A map with radioactive contamination after the Chernobyl disaster

A map with radioactive contamination after the Chernobyl disaster

Costumes of Liquidators, approximately 800,000 people who were in charge of the removal of the consequences of the April 26, 1986 Chernobyl disaster on the site of the event.

Costumes of Liquidators, approximately 800,000 people who were in charge of the removal of the consequences of the April 26, 1986 Chernobyl disaster on the site of the event.

Other costumes

Other costumes

The effects...

The effects...

Toys of the kids from Prypiat

Toys of the kids from Prypiat

A display of road signs for various settlements near Chernobyl. Abandoned areas inside the zone of alienation are struck out with a pink slash.

A display of road signs for various settlements near Chernobyl. Abandoned areas inside the "Zone of alienation" are struck out with a pink slash.

Chernivtsi (Ukraine)

Chernivtsi (Romanian: Cernăuţi; Ukrainian: Чернівці) is the administrative center of Chernivtsi Oblast (province) in western Ukraine.

Chernivtsi on map

Chernivtsi on map

The city lies in the historic Northern Bukovina region and is situated on the Prut river, a tributary of the Danube.

As of the 2001 Ukrainian Census, the city’s population is 240,600.According to the latest All-Ukrainian population census in 2001, the population of Chernivtsi was approximately 236,700 people of 65 nationalities.

Among them, 189,000 (79.8%) are Ukrainians, 26,700 (11.3%) Russians, 10,500 (4.4%) Romanians; 3,800 (1.6%) Moldavians, 1,400 (0.6%) Polish; 1,300 (0.6%) Jews; 2,900 (1.2%) other nationalities.

Based on the last available Soviet data, the population of the city, as of January 1, 1989, was approximately 295,000 residents.

Among these, there are some 172,000 Ukrainians, 46,000 Russians, 16,000 Romanians, 13,000 Moldavians, 7,000 Poles and others. Historically, the city was very multinational. From 1870 to the Second World War, Jews were the biggest population group of Czernowitz.

In 1930, according to the Romanian census, the population of the city was 26.8% Jewish, 23.2% Romanians, 20.8% Germans, 18.6% Ukrainians, and 1.5% Russians.he Romanian population in Chernivtsi started decreasing rapidly after 1950.

Many Romanians fled to Romania or were deported to Siberia (where most of them died), and the remaining Romanian population quickly became a minority and assimilated with the majority.

Nowadays, the Romanian minority in Chernivtsi is still decreasing as a result of cultural assimilation and emigration to Romania.

Source: Wikipedia

Travel Journal

What would be if I will go to Chernivtsi, in Ukraine ?
We took the train from Bucharest to Suceava.

After we arrive in the railway station from Suceava-Burdujeni, we were surprised to admire the railway station that was build in 1869.

After we put our legs in the railway station, an old gypsy man came to us and start to say that Suceava is a dangerous city, and we must have attention because of that and other rubbish (gypsy baloney).

After that, he see that we don’t give him money or something, and he start to say that he needs some money to go at his home, with train.

Can you belive that?

In 2009, someone in European Union could have such momments !

You remember an episode of South Park, called “Night of the Living Homeless“ ? 😛

“Change..Change…you have any change” :)))

After that we escape from the living gypsy, we take the local bus and we go to the centre of the city.A single ticket is 1.5 RON (New Romanian Leu)…almost 0.35 euro-cents.

From the center, we decided to go to the History Museum, to see the throne room of Stephen the Great, the ruler of Moldavian Kingdom between 1457 and 1504.

We take the taxi and we go to the History Museum. The price of taxi in Suceava is 1.80 RON (almost 0.5 Euro).

The museum is good, it has special rooms for all parts of history…start with prehistoric times and ends with WW2.

They also have a good collection of coins, especially medieval moldavian coins from monasteries.

Suceava is not a big city, and we go to the stronghold of the city, which was the capital of Moldavian Kingdom in the time of Stephen the Great.

Up to the hill were the fortress is built, the landscape is amazing, you can see almost all Suceava, and the road from the Mc Donald’s to the stronghold is through forest, simple amazing !

After this walking, we go to the bus station in Suceava and we took the bus for Chernivtsi (2.00 PM). The distance is about 82 km, through the border point Siret in Romania and Porubne in Ukraine.

Before we arrive to the border, we completed an Immigration Card, where we wrote our departure with destination (a hotel), name with surname, citizenship, passport number and our signature.

We didn’t pay anything, we just give the document to the Ukrainian border police and they give us to keep half from the paper. With that half paper you can leave Ukraine, and you must keep it at you.

Before we arrived in Chernivtsi, we pass through Hlyboka (in Romanian is Adâncata), a small Romanian town in Northern Bukovina. The population of Hlyboka District is majority Romanian (51.4 %).

In June 1940, Soviet Union take Northern Bukovina which was eliberated by Romanian Army in 1941.

Romania was forced to give the northern part of Bukovina to the USSR by the 1947 Paris peace treaty. The territory became part of the Ukrainian SSR as Chernivtsi Oblast (province). After the war the Soviet government deported or killed about 41,000 Romanians.

After one and a half hour we arrive to Chernivtsi.

We go to search a bank to buy some UAH with Euro.

The currency was 1 Euro=10 UAH (Ukrainian hryvnia).

With Ukrainian currency, we go to eat and to drink something. We eat at a fasto-food some hamburgers, we drink Kvass (Kbac) and we eat Ukrainian icecream, which is cheaper and good.

With 10 UAH (1 Euro) I eat one big hamburger, one glass of Kvass and one icecream 😀

Can you belive that? 😛

After that, we go for a walk in a park, not so far from the center. We drink some Ukrainian beers and we decided to come back to Romania.

We go to the Central Bus Station (Avtovogzal) and we find a Romanian from Chernivtsi to take us to Suceava. We want to give him some money but he refuse to accept something from us.

We arrive in Suceava at 21.40 and we go to eat and drink,

After that, we go to the railway station to catch the train for Bucharest at 23.04 PM.

The center of Suceava

The center of Suceava

Suceava-Burdujeni railway station

Suceava-Burdujeni railway station

Map of Bukovina

Map of Bukovina

Throne room of Stephen III of Moldavia also known as Stephen the Great (History Museum from Suceava)

Throne room of Stephen III of Moldavia also known as Stephen the Great (History Museum from Suceava)

Solar symbol on a traditional gate near the fortress of Suceava

Solar symbol on a traditional gate near the fortress of Suceava

A great view from the fortress above Suceava

A great view from the fortress above Suceava

Walls of the fortress

Walls of the fortress

On the road from the fortress to the city (through forest).

On the road from the fortress to the city (through forest)

In the bus to Chernivtsi

In the bus to Chernivtsi (old soviet bus)

Timetable in Central Bus Station from Chernivtsi

Timetable in Central Bus Station from Chernivtsi

Central Bus Station from Chernivtsi (Avtovogzal)

Central Bus Station from Chernivtsi (Avtovokzal in ukrainian, Avtovogzal in russian)

Old soviet bus station

Old soviet bus station

Post box

Post box

Local trolleybus from Chernivtsi

Local trolleybus from Chernivtsi

On the road to the centre

On the road to the centre

Law and Order (Ukrainian Police)

Law and Order (Ukrainian Police)

Some nice blocks

Some nice blocks

Plate number from Chernivtsi

Plate number from Chernivtsi

A message to recruting people for sport (Ivan Geshko) Sport-Health-Future

A message to recruting people for sport (Ivan Geshko) Sport-Health-Future

Public phone

Public phone

On this guide panel you can see the name Suceava

On this guide panel you can see the name Suceava

Marshrutnoye taksi or маршрутка (Marshrutka)

Marshrutnoye taksi or маршрутка (Marshrutka)

Kvass (квас) and ukrainian icecream

Kvass (квас) and ukrainian icecream

We saw this ukrainian girl just after we buy some humbergers, she was staying in the front of us

We saw this ukrainian girl just after we buy some humbergers, she was staying in the front of us

a central street in Chernivtsi

A central street in Chernivtsi

Shevchenko Park

Shevchenko Park

Shevchenko Park - A park for Culture and Rest

Shevchenko Park - A park for Culture and Rest

They are still alive !

They are still alive !

Raiffeisen Bank Aval

Raiffeisen Bank Aval

The soviet bus which take us from Suceava to Cernivitsi

The soviet bus which take us from Suceava to Cernivitsi

Ukrainian hryvnia (UAH)

Ukrainian hryvnia (UAH)

A very strong ukrainian beer called Desant (Desant Spetsnaz) 7.2%

A very strong ukrainian beer called Desant (Desant Spetsnaz) 7.2%

Comrat (Moldova)

Comrat (Romanian: Comrat; Gagauz: Komrat; Russian: Комрат / Komrat) is a city in Moldova and the capital of the autonomous region of Găgăuzia.

It is located in the south of the country, on the Ialpug River.

 

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Găgăuzia in Basarabia (Click on the map)

 

In 2004, Comrat’s population was 23,429, of which the vast majority are Gagauzians.

Gagauzia (Gagauz: Gagauziya or Gagauz-Yeri; Romanian: Găgăuzia; Russian: Гагаузия), formally known as the Autonomous Territorial Unit of Găgăuzia (Gagauz Yeri) (Gagauz: Avtonom Territorial Bölümlüü Gagauz Yeri, Romanian: Unitatea Teritorială Autonomă Găgăuzia, Russian: Автономное территориальное образование Гагаузия / Avtonomnoye territorial’noye obrazobaniye), is an autonomous region of Moldova.

The Gagauz people are a small Turkish-speaking ethnic group living mostly in southern Moldova (Gagauzia), southwestern Ukraine (Budjak-southern Basarabia) and north-eastern Bulgaria (Dobruja).

Unlike most other Turkic-speaking peoples, the Gagauzians are predominantly Orthodox Christians.

There is a related ethnic group also called Gagavuz (or Gajal) living in the European part of northwestern Turkey.

Regions with significant populations:

Moldova 147,500
Ukraine 31,900
Greece 30,000
Turkey 15,000
Russia 12,200
Bulgaria 540
Romania 3,000
Kazakhstan 700

Source: Wikipedia

Travel Journal

„…Wishing to visit Gagauzia, we decided, in a rainy vernal morning to have a flying visit to Comrat.

Arriving at the South Station from Chisinau, after we paid 34 lei/person (2.2 euros) for ticket, we took in hurry a minibus with destination Chisinau-Taraclia.

The first thing we have noticed in South was that Moldova has bad roads, it was impossible to stay calm in the bus.

On the way, we remarked that on both sides of the driveway there were a lot of vineyards.

After one and half hours the driver stopped in a very small station, with few buses-we arrived in Comrat.

At the beginning, the city appeared to be uninhabited and old, we saw few people walking on the streets.

After a little walk in the town, we discovered some little shops, which seemed to be forsaken and we found a market place.

We decided to see what are the prices and what do the gagauzians buy from there.

We must confess, even the sellers were fairly polite, we felt a bit uncomfortable because of the people who didn’t stop staring at us. It was strange to see how while you were buying hot peppers you were surrounded by people who were quite smiling at you.

Another thing we have noticed was the big number of pariah dogs which were following you till you didn’t drive them away. Having a walk on the streets of Comrat we saw a lot of old houses and buildings, remained from USSR period.

If you want to ask someone from there about something, we think you should know more languages. Gagauzian people have a strange way of speaking: they use two languages (gagauzian and russian ) at the same time, so it’s difficult to understand them.

After we passed a whole day in Comrat, searching for a place to eat, we came back to the station to take the bus. For this time we paid 36 lei (2.35 euros) for the ticket and we took the last places from a bus.

It was a very old bus, with broken chairs which were moving at the simple flick.

In more than one and half hours we were in Chisinau, tired but pleased that we had seen something different from the usual-an interesting and strange city, Comrat…”

 

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A small street from Comrat

 

 

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State University from Comrat (Main building)

 

 

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Galatsana street near University

 

 

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State University from Comrat (A "luxury" building for a city with 23.429 people)

 

 

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Assembly of Gagauz-Yeri (Găgăuzia)

 

 

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Moldavian and Gagauzian flags on the Assembly of Găgăuzia

 

 

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(Moldavian Bank in Comrat) Moldova Agroindbank

 

 

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Periphery street

 

 

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City Hall

 

 

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Small blocks

 

 

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Big blocks in soviet style

 

 

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An old communist building

 

 

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Other soviet blocks

 

 

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Communist blocks

 

 

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One of the best highschools from Comrat

 

 

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Music school

 

 

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Orthodox church (gagauz people are Orthodox)

 

 

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Just a street...

 

 

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University of Comrat

 

 

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I think this is their cultural house

 

 

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Lenin...

 

 

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Marshutka "маршрутное такси" (маршрутка)

 

 

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People's Assembly

 

 

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Near to the market

 

 

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Shops

 

 

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Car plate from Comrat (GE is for Gagauz Eri)

 

 

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Old stuffs in bazaar

 

 

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A commercial center near to the bazaar

 

 

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Fruits on the street

 

 

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One of the entrance to bazaar

 

 

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Publicity panel

 

 

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A nice house

 

 

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Gagauzian food 🙂

 

 

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Building in construction

 

 

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Near to the bus station (avtovokzal)

 

 

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New building

 

 

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Toilet in russian

 

 

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:))))

 

 

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Lenin street

 

 

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Inside of Cultural House..i think...

 

 

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In the center

 

 

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An orchestra singing inside of Cultural House

 

 

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The same statue with Lenin

 

 

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Gagauzian Disneyland 😀

 

 

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Orthodox church

 

 

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Gagauzian girl 😛

 

 

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The street near to the bazaar

 

 

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A nice dog 😛

 

 

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Gagauzian beggar "you have any change?" 😦

 

 

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In bazaar... (all gagauzians looks at me when i made this photo) weird...

 

 

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Gagauzian faces 🙂

 

 

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Strawberries

 

 

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Gagauzian vane

 

 

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Pharmacy (Apteka in Russian)

 

 

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Court of Justice from Comrat

 

 

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Other typical red blocks...