Bucharest (România)

Bucharest (Romanian: București) is the capital, industrial, cultural, and financial centre of Romania. It is the largest city in Romania, located in the southeast of the country, and lies on the banks of the Dâmboviţa River.

Bucharest was first mentioned in documents as early as 1459. Since then it has gone through a variety of changes, becoming the state capital of Romania in 1862 and steadily consolidating its position as the centre of the Romanian mass media, culture and arts. Its eclectic architecture is a mix of historical (neo-classical), interbellum (Bauhaus and Art Deco), Communist-era and modern. In the period between the two World Wars, the city’s elegant architecture and the sophistication of its elite earned Bucharest the nickname of the „Little Paris of the East” (Micul Paris). Although many buildings and districts in the historic centre were damaged or destroyed by war, earthquakes and Nicolae Ceaușescu‘s program of systematization, many survived. In recent years, the city has been experiencing an economic and cultural boom.

According to January 1, 2009 official estimates, Bucharest proper has a population of 1,944,367. The urban area extends beyond the limits of Bucharest proper and has a population of 2 million people. Adding the satellite towns around the urban area, the metropolitan area of Bucharest has a population of 2.15 million people. According to unofficial data, the population is more than 3 million. Bucharest is the 6th largest city in the European Union by population within city limits.

Economically, Bucharest is the most prosperous city in Romania and is one of the main industrial centres and transportation hubs of Eastern Europe. The city has a broad range of convention facilities, educational facilities, cultural venues, shopping arcades and recreational areas.

The city proper is administratively known as the Municipality of Bucharest (Municipiul București), and has the same administrative level as a county, being further subdivided into six sectors.

Source: Wikipedia

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Ungheni (Moldova)

Ungheni (population: 35,157) is the seventh largest city in Moldova and, since 2003, the seat of Ungheni District.

There is a bridge across the Prut and a border checkpoint to Romania. There is another border town with the same name in Romania (Ungheni, Iaşi), on the other side of the Prut River.

1,520 mm (4 ft 11 5⁄6 in) Russian gauge – CIS states (including Russia), Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Mongolia (approx. 17% of the world’s railways)

1,435 mm (4 ft 8 1⁄2 in) Standard gauge – Europe, Argentina, United States, Canada, China, Korea, Australia, Middle East, North Africa, Mexico, Cuba, Panama, Venezuela, Peru, Uruguay and Philippines. Also high-speed lines in Japan and Spain. (approx. 60% of the world’s railways).

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Bălţi (Moldova)

For more informations, click on the map

Bălţi (Polish: Bielce, Russian: Бельцы [Bel’tsy] and Бэлць [Bėlts’], Ukrainian: Бєльці [Byel’tsi], Yiddish: בעלץ [Belts]) is a city in Moldova. It is the second largest in terms of area and economic importance after Chişinău, and the third largest in terms of population after Chişinău and Tiraspol. The city is one of the five Moldovan municipalities. Bălţi, sometimes also called „the northern capital”, is a major industrial, cultural and commercial centre and transportation hub in the north of the country. It is situated 127 kilometres (79 mi) north of the capital Chişinău, and is located on the river Răut, a tributary of the Dniester, on a hilly landscape in the Bălţi steppe.

The word „bălţi” (pl. of Romanian sing. „baltă„) means „swamps”, „puddles”, or „pools”. It is believed that the city had been named thus because it was founded on a hill dominating the wetland formed where the creek Răuţel („Little Răut”) falls into the river Răut.

In addition to the official name Bălţi and the Russian name Бельцы (Beltsy), between 1940-1989 in Moldovan Cyrillic alphabet, and after 1989 in Russian, the name was/is also rendered in Cyrillic as Бэлць.

Theaters:

  • Vasile Alecsandri theatre
  • „Eugene Ionesco” Theatre
  • „Licurici” Republican Puppet Theatre
  • „B.P.Hajdeu” Republican Drama-Muzical Theatre
  • „Mihai Eminescu” National Theatre
  • „Luceafarul” Republican Theatre
  • Municipal Theatre „Satiricus I.L. Caragiale”

Museums and art galleries

  • „Exhibition of the Union of painters „Constantin Brâncuşi”
  • Artum Art Gallery

According to the 2004 Moldovan Census, data submitted by the Department of Statistics and Sociology of the Republic of Moldova, the population of municipality of Bălţi was 127,561, of which the population of the city itself was 122,669, and that of the suburban villages of Elizaveta and Sadovoe was of 3,523, respectively 1,369. Of these, 58,418 were men and 69,143 were women.

Ethnic Groups, 2004:

Ethnicity Number %
Moldovan 66,877 52.4 %
Ukrainian 30,288 23.7 %
Russian 24,526 19.2 %
Romanian 2,258 1.8 %
Pole 862 0.7 %
Jewish 411 0.3 %
Bulgarian 297 0.2 %
Roma 272 0.2 %
Gagauz 243 0.2 %
other 1,527 1.2 %
not declared 183 0.1 %

A info panel with international routes in the bus station of Bălţi

Bus station (Autogară)

A soviet scales 😀

This nice dog diddn't want to eat our plăcinta 😦

The main street near the bus station.We take the bus from here, which goes to the city center

An old soviet trolley

The mayor prepare the city for the date of May 9, when Germany lost the war and sign the surrender act before soviets at Berlin

A street near to the center

Memorial for soviet soldiers from WWII

Mishka (Мишка) mascot from 1980 Summer Olympics in Moscow, Soviet Union

Bălţi-City Station at Moldovan Railway

On the platform of Bălţi-City Station

A guide panel in the center

Decebal street (Decebal was the king of Dacia in the time of wars against romans 101-102,105-106)

We pass on this street when we come from railway station to city center

Theoretical Highschool Mihai Eminescu

In left it was nr 3 🙂

Now it is 589...

A nice XIX century building in the center (i think this is matrimonial palace)

A wedding in the city center

Vasile Alecsandri theatre in the square from the city center with the same name

Cinema Patria (the subtitle is in russian)

A panel with some great citizens from the city

A monument for the holocaust

It says "for the jewish victims killed by fascists in the second world war"

Gogol Theoretical Highschool-School nr. 6 (you can notice the soviet coat of arms up)

A soviet medium tank T-34

A banner with the message "the victory day for the soviet people in the great war for defending the homeland"

A monument of Stefan the Great (2003)

An old Lada car for the Police (Poliţia)

A panel with the train routes in the Bălţi-City Station

Inside the train Moscow-Chişinău (you can notice the curtains with Moldova)

We buy a ticket on platzcart on the route Bălţi-Chişinău with the international train from Moscow. The price for the ticket is 31 moldavian lei, which means 8 romanian lei or 2 euro. (the time of travel is about 3.20 hours because train pass through Ungheni)

Sofia (Bulgaria)

For more infos click oon the map

Sofia (Bulgarian: София) is the capital and largest city of Bulgaria and the 12th largest city by population in the European Union, with 1.4 million people living in the Capital Municipality. It is located in western Bulgaria, at the foot of Mount Vitosha, and is the administrative, cultural, economic, and educational centre of the country.

Sofia was first mentioned in the sources as Serdica in relation to Marcus Licinius Crassus’ campaigns in 29 BC. The name Serdica or Sardica (Σερδική, Σαρδική) was popular in Latin, Ancient Greek and Byzantine Greek sources from Antiquity and the Middle Ages; it was related to the local Celtic tribe of the Serdi.

Sofia’s development as a significant settlement owes much to its central position in the Balkans. It is situated in western Bulgaria, at the northern foot of the Vitosha mountain, in the Sofia Valley that is surrounded by mountains on all sides. The valley is the largest one in the country with territory of 1,186 square kilometres (458 sq mi) and average altitude of 550 metres (1,804 ft). Three mountain passes lead to the city, which have been key roads since antiquity, connecting the Adriatic Sea and Central Europe with the Black and Aegean Seas.

It is located 130 kilometres (81 mi) northwest of Plovdiv, Bulgaria’s second largest city, 340 kilometres (211 mi) west of Burgas 380 kilometres (236 mi) west of Varna, Bulgaria’s major port-cities on the Bulgarian Black Sea Coast. The city is situated at less than 200 kilometres (124 mi) from the borders with three countries: 55 kilometres (34 mi) from Kalotina on the Serbian border, 113 kilometres (70 mi) from Gyueshevo on the frontier with the Republic of Macedonia and 183 kilometres (114 mi) from the Greek border at Kulata.

Bulgarian "meze-мезé" appetizer (with mastika is great)

Romanian Dacia store in Sofia 🙂 (in last years more and more bulgarians buy Dacia cars)

Front view of the renovated Central Railway Station in Sofia (renovated and reconstructed in the 2000s under Milan Dobrev and Olympic Stadium Munich-style tensile elements of 4,500 m² were added)

A cute little bulgarian cat (kotka :P)

Bulgarian coach at first class in the train Bucharest-Sofia

Konstantin Velichkov (Константин Величков) Blvd

Konstantin Velichkov Metro Station

The same station operational since 28.01.1998

Bulgarian tram in old center

Holy Sunday Church (Bulgarian: църква „Света Неделя“ Sveta Nedelya), probably built in the 10th century

Vitosha Boulevard (булевард "Витоша")

Central Sofia Market Hall (It was opened in 1911 and is today an important trade centre in the city)

Banya Bashi Mosque (Баня баши джамия) build in 1576

Sofia Public Mineral Baths (It was built in the early 20th century near the former Turkish bath -then destroyed- and was used as the city's public baths until 1986)

Bulgarian National Bank (down you can observe Viennese yellow cobblestones)

A turtle at National Museum of Natural History

Grand Hotel Bulgaria, near the National Museum of Natural History

The Russian Church or the Church of St. Nicholas the Miracle-Maker, built in 1914 is dedicated to the patron-saint of the Russian Tsar at the time Nicholas II

The early Byzantine Church of St Sophia was built in the 6th century on the place of an ancient Roman theatre and several earlier churches.

The gold-domed Alexander Nevsky Cathedral was built in the early 20th century in memory of the 200,000 Russian, Ukrainian, Belorussian and Bulgarian soldiers, who died in the Russo-Turkish War, 1877–1878. It is one of the largest Eastern Orthodox cathedrals in the world. The cathedral's gold-plated dome is 45 m high, with the bell tower reaching 50.52 m.

The Monument to the Tsar Liberator is an equestrian monument in the centre of Sofia, the capital of Bulgaria. It was erected in honour of Russian Emperor Alexander II who liberated Bulgaria of Ottoman rule during the Russo-Turkish War of 1877-78.

St. Clement of Ohrid University of Sofia (Софийски университет „Св. Климент Охридски)

National Assembly of Bulgaria

Monument to the Soviet Army built in 1954, near to Vasil Levski National Stadium

Monument of Vasil Levski in Borisova Gradina (Boris's Park)

Slaveykov Square (Площад Славейков)

St. Sedmochislenitsi Church which was created between 1901 and 1902 through the conversion of an abandoned Ottoman mosque, and was inaugurated on 27 July 1903. The church is named after Cyril and Methodius and their five disciples, known in the Orthodox Church collectively as the Sedmochislenitsi.

Georgi Rakovski Street (Улица Георги Раковски)

A nice old Jaguar 🙂

The Church of St George is a late Roman rotunda dated from 4th century situated in the courtyard of the Sheraton Sofia Hotel. It was constructed with red bricks and is considered the oldest building in Sofia. It is known for its Medieval frescoes in the central dome dating from 12-14th centuries.

Presidential Palace

Serdika Metro Station (into operation since October 31, 2000)

The biggest shopping mall in Bulgaria (Serdika Center)

The mall is located on the Sitnyakovo Blvd.

It has 210 stores with a commercial space of over 51,000 square meters on three levels, and office space of some 30,000 square meters

Inside of Central Railway Station (Централна железопътна гара) located near Central Bus Station (Централна автогара София, Tsentralna avtogara)

Communist blocks

Martenitsa (мартеници) is a small piece of adornment, made of white and red yarn and worn from March 1 until around the end of March (or the first time an individual sees a stork, swallow or budding tree). In Romania we also have a similar but not identical holiday on March 1, called "Mărţişor".

The train ticket from Ruse to Sofia which was 17 leva-34 lei-9 euro (the distance is 405 km)

Bus and metro tickets are 1 leva, which mean 0.50 euro or 2 lei

Bus and metro tickets are 1 leva, which mean 0.50 euro or 2 lei

National Museum of Natural History

National Museum of Natural History

Gura Portiţei (România)

For more informations about this place, click on the map

For more informations about this place, click on the map

The little harbour

The little harbour

The exit from the harbour

The exit from the harbour

Some small houses on the beach (63 lei/15 euro per night)

Some small houses on the beach (63 lei/15 euro per night)

Other houses

Other houses

On the beach...

On the beach...

In the center of the complex

In the center of the complex

Other photo with the harbour

Other photo with the harbour

The beach and Black Sea

A photo of the beach and the Black Sea made under umbrella 😛

Lifeguard tower

Lifeguard tower

One of the two mini-bays from the beach

One of the two mini-bays from the beach

Here you can listen old romanian and russian songs in the night, at a big fire. The atmosphere is wonderful

Here you can listen old romanian and russian songs in the night, at a big fire. The atmosphere is wonderful

The second mini-bay

The second mini-bay

Outside the complex, in the northern part

Outside the complex, in the northern part

Just a little swamp with many rowdy frogs and snakes :)

Just a little swamp with many rowdy frogs and snakes 🙂

Millions of sea shells...

Millions of sea shells...

One of the most beautiful walk that you can make near a sea

One of the most beautiful walk that you can make near a sea

You can see Crimea ? :)

You can see Crimea ? 🙂

A log astray

A log astray

Do you wanna play with them? :)

Do you wanna play with them? 🙂

Other log...

Other log...

In the left side you have the Danube Delta with Goloviţa Lake and Black Sea in the right

In the left side you have the Danube Delta with Goloviţa Lake and Black Sea in the right

The Place of Love... (i will remember this place my entire life)

The Place of Love... (i will remember this place my entire life)

The sunset over the swamps

The sunset over the swamps

A cute little frog near to our house :)

A cute little frog near to our house 🙂

Chernivtsi (Ukraine)

Chernivtsi (Romanian: Cernăuţi; Ukrainian: Чернівці) is the administrative center of Chernivtsi Oblast (province) in western Ukraine.

Chernivtsi on map

Chernivtsi on map

The city lies in the historic Northern Bukovina region and is situated on the Prut river, a tributary of the Danube.

As of the 2001 Ukrainian Census, the city’s population is 240,600.According to the latest All-Ukrainian population census in 2001, the population of Chernivtsi was approximately 236,700 people of 65 nationalities.

Among them, 189,000 (79.8%) are Ukrainians, 26,700 (11.3%) Russians, 10,500 (4.4%) Romanians; 3,800 (1.6%) Moldavians, 1,400 (0.6%) Polish; 1,300 (0.6%) Jews; 2,900 (1.2%) other nationalities.

Based on the last available Soviet data, the population of the city, as of January 1, 1989, was approximately 295,000 residents.

Among these, there are some 172,000 Ukrainians, 46,000 Russians, 16,000 Romanians, 13,000 Moldavians, 7,000 Poles and others. Historically, the city was very multinational. From 1870 to the Second World War, Jews were the biggest population group of Czernowitz.

In 1930, according to the Romanian census, the population of the city was 26.8% Jewish, 23.2% Romanians, 20.8% Germans, 18.6% Ukrainians, and 1.5% Russians.he Romanian population in Chernivtsi started decreasing rapidly after 1950.

Many Romanians fled to Romania or were deported to Siberia (where most of them died), and the remaining Romanian population quickly became a minority and assimilated with the majority.

Nowadays, the Romanian minority in Chernivtsi is still decreasing as a result of cultural assimilation and emigration to Romania.

Source: Wikipedia

Travel Journal

What would be if I will go to Chernivtsi, in Ukraine ?
We took the train from Bucharest to Suceava.

After we arrive in the railway station from Suceava-Burdujeni, we were surprised to admire the railway station that was build in 1869.

After we put our legs in the railway station, an old gypsy man came to us and start to say that Suceava is a dangerous city, and we must have attention because of that and other rubbish (gypsy baloney).

After that, he see that we don’t give him money or something, and he start to say that he needs some money to go at his home, with train.

Can you belive that?

In 2009, someone in European Union could have such momments !

You remember an episode of South Park, called “Night of the Living Homeless“ ? 😛

“Change..Change…you have any change” :)))

After that we escape from the living gypsy, we take the local bus and we go to the centre of the city.A single ticket is 1.5 RON (New Romanian Leu)…almost 0.35 euro-cents.

From the center, we decided to go to the History Museum, to see the throne room of Stephen the Great, the ruler of Moldavian Kingdom between 1457 and 1504.

We take the taxi and we go to the History Museum. The price of taxi in Suceava is 1.80 RON (almost 0.5 Euro).

The museum is good, it has special rooms for all parts of history…start with prehistoric times and ends with WW2.

They also have a good collection of coins, especially medieval moldavian coins from monasteries.

Suceava is not a big city, and we go to the stronghold of the city, which was the capital of Moldavian Kingdom in the time of Stephen the Great.

Up to the hill were the fortress is built, the landscape is amazing, you can see almost all Suceava, and the road from the Mc Donald’s to the stronghold is through forest, simple amazing !

After this walking, we go to the bus station in Suceava and we took the bus for Chernivtsi (2.00 PM). The distance is about 82 km, through the border point Siret in Romania and Porubne in Ukraine.

Before we arrive to the border, we completed an Immigration Card, where we wrote our departure with destination (a hotel), name with surname, citizenship, passport number and our signature.

We didn’t pay anything, we just give the document to the Ukrainian border police and they give us to keep half from the paper. With that half paper you can leave Ukraine, and you must keep it at you.

Before we arrived in Chernivtsi, we pass through Hlyboka (in Romanian is Adâncata), a small Romanian town in Northern Bukovina. The population of Hlyboka District is majority Romanian (51.4 %).

In June 1940, Soviet Union take Northern Bukovina which was eliberated by Romanian Army in 1941.

Romania was forced to give the northern part of Bukovina to the USSR by the 1947 Paris peace treaty. The territory became part of the Ukrainian SSR as Chernivtsi Oblast (province). After the war the Soviet government deported or killed about 41,000 Romanians.

After one and a half hour we arrive to Chernivtsi.

We go to search a bank to buy some UAH with Euro.

The currency was 1 Euro=10 UAH (Ukrainian hryvnia).

With Ukrainian currency, we go to eat and to drink something. We eat at a fasto-food some hamburgers, we drink Kvass (Kbac) and we eat Ukrainian icecream, which is cheaper and good.

With 10 UAH (1 Euro) I eat one big hamburger, one glass of Kvass and one icecream 😀

Can you belive that? 😛

After that, we go for a walk in a park, not so far from the center. We drink some Ukrainian beers and we decided to come back to Romania.

We go to the Central Bus Station (Avtovogzal) and we find a Romanian from Chernivtsi to take us to Suceava. We want to give him some money but he refuse to accept something from us.

We arrive in Suceava at 21.40 and we go to eat and drink,

After that, we go to the railway station to catch the train for Bucharest at 23.04 PM.

The center of Suceava

The center of Suceava

Suceava-Burdujeni railway station

Suceava-Burdujeni railway station

Map of Bukovina

Map of Bukovina

Throne room of Stephen III of Moldavia also known as Stephen the Great (History Museum from Suceava)

Throne room of Stephen III of Moldavia also known as Stephen the Great (History Museum from Suceava)

Solar symbol on a traditional gate near the fortress of Suceava

Solar symbol on a traditional gate near the fortress of Suceava

A great view from the fortress above Suceava

A great view from the fortress above Suceava

Walls of the fortress

Walls of the fortress

On the road from the fortress to the city (through forest).

On the road from the fortress to the city (through forest)

In the bus to Chernivtsi

In the bus to Chernivtsi (old soviet bus)

Timetable in Central Bus Station from Chernivtsi

Timetable in Central Bus Station from Chernivtsi

Central Bus Station from Chernivtsi (Avtovogzal)

Central Bus Station from Chernivtsi (Avtovokzal in ukrainian, Avtovogzal in russian)

Old soviet bus station

Old soviet bus station

Post box

Post box

Local trolleybus from Chernivtsi

Local trolleybus from Chernivtsi

On the road to the centre

On the road to the centre

Law and Order (Ukrainian Police)

Law and Order (Ukrainian Police)

Some nice blocks

Some nice blocks

Plate number from Chernivtsi

Plate number from Chernivtsi

A message to recruting people for sport (Ivan Geshko) Sport-Health-Future

A message to recruting people for sport (Ivan Geshko) Sport-Health-Future

Public phone

Public phone

On this guide panel you can see the name Suceava

On this guide panel you can see the name Suceava

Marshrutnoye taksi or маршрутка (Marshrutka)

Marshrutnoye taksi or маршрутка (Marshrutka)

Kvass (квас) and ukrainian icecream

Kvass (квас) and ukrainian icecream

We saw this ukrainian girl just after we buy some humbergers, she was staying in the front of us

We saw this ukrainian girl just after we buy some humbergers, she was staying in the front of us

a central street in Chernivtsi

A central street in Chernivtsi

Shevchenko Park

Shevchenko Park

Shevchenko Park - A park for Culture and Rest

Shevchenko Park - A park for Culture and Rest

They are still alive !

They are still alive !

Raiffeisen Bank Aval

Raiffeisen Bank Aval

The soviet bus which take us from Suceava to Cernivitsi

The soviet bus which take us from Suceava to Cernivitsi

Ukrainian hryvnia (UAH)

Ukrainian hryvnia (UAH)

A very strong ukrainian beer called Desant (Desant Spetsnaz) 7.2%

A very strong ukrainian beer called Desant (Desant Spetsnaz) 7.2%

Tiraspol (Transnistria)

Tiraspol (Romanian: Tiraspol; Russian: Тирасполь and Ukrainian: Тирасполь) is the second largest city in Moldova and is the capital and administrative centre of the de facto independent Pridnestrovian Moldavian Republic – TransnistriaPMR”).

The city is located on the eastern bank of the Dniester River.

transnistria-harta-gdb-rferl-org

Click on the map

Tiraspol is a regional hub of light industry, such as furniture and electrical goods production.

The toponym consists of two words: Tiras — the ancient Greek name for the Dniester River, and polis – city.

In 1989 the city had a population of about 190,000 and in 1992 203,000. 41% were Russians, 32% Ukrainians and 18% were Moldovans (Romanians).

Sister cities:

2004 Census in Transnistria:

Total population (including Bender): 555,347 (percentages below refer to this first figure)

Total population (minus Bender): 450,337

  • Moldovans (Romanians): 31.9%
  • Russians: 30.3%
  • Ukrainians: 28.8%
  • Bulgarians: 2%
  • Poles: 2%
  • Gagauz: 1.5%
  • Jews: 1.3%
  • Belarusians: 1%
  • Germans: 0.6%
  • Others: 0.5%

Transnistria, also known as Trans-Dniester, Transdniestria, and Pridnestrovie is a disputed region in southeast Europe.

Since its declaration of independence in 1990, followed by the War of Transnistria in 1992, it is governed by the unrecognized Pridnestrovian Moldavian Republic (PMR), which claims the left bank of the river Dniester and the city of Bendery (Tighina) within the former Moldavian SSR.

The modern Republic of Moldova does not recognize the secession and considers PMR-controlled territories to be a part of Moldova’s sovereign territory.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Travel jurnal

„… Many people know about Tiraspol, but few of them had the chance to go there. We were lucky to pass a day on the left side of river Dniester.

From the beginning of the day, we took the bus from the Central station, not before to buy the tickets from a separated ticket office.

It costs 32 lei/person (~3$). After an hour, we arrived at the customs, where we were asked to leave the bus.

A nice woman, who takes care that every passenger passes the frontier, led us to the counter from where we could take an inquest to complete it an official procedure that allow you to pass in Transnistria.

We paid 22 lei/person after we stayed in a big crowd, whereupon the frontier guard gave us a part of the inquest without whom we don’t have the permission to leave Transnistria.

Before that, the persons who aren’t citizens of Republic of Moldova have to register to another wicket, it’s enough to show the passport. We returned at our bus and continued the road till the station of Tiraspol.

The driver stopped in Tighina for few minutes, before we passed through the bridge who rememberd me about the conflict of Transnistria form 1992.At the beginning of the bridge we saw a Russian tanc-a way for showing the power of those who were fighting for “liberty”.

In less than 15 minutes we arrived in Tiraspol, a city which seemed to be lost by civilization, people and modernization. The bus stopped at the railway station (also for buses) and the first thing we did was to ask for the left bus that goes to Chisinau.

Unfortunately, the reaction of the seller from the ticket office wasn’t so kind. I had to ask for three times that I get an uncertain answer. I noticed that on the wall of their booth was suspended the portrait of Smirnov-the transnistrian leader.

We changed money at an exchange and for 100 lei we received 70 transnistrian roubles. While we were looking around, we paid attention at a strange smell that came from the railway station. It was a stench emanated from the train which came from Russia and had a setback at the railway station from Tiraspol.

A lot of people who got out from the train had big teddy bears in their hands-maybe at Moscow they cost cheaper than in Transnistria, who knows?! 🙂

Averting from that stinking place, we decided to see the other part of the city, which had the same traits: old soviet buildings on which were put communist signs, bad roads, silent people-things that make you feel in another country, in another period, as in USSR.

We tried to find supermarket “Sheriff”, but, without luck, we asked the citizens (in Russian, of course!) to tell us where it is.

It’s interesting to know that in Tiraspol “Sheriff” is a common name for a stadium, for a football team, a supermarket, a sort of vodka (and so on), what can that mean?! Well, “Sheriff” is a quite big market, where you can find Russian and Ukrainian products, some of them cheaper than on the other side of river Dniester.

With 70 transnistrian roubles, we bought more than we could buy in Chisinau, with the same money.

It was already murk and we had to turn back to the station, to take the bus.

How we couldn’t receive an amenable answer from the ticket sellers, to know when the bus will come, we waited outside, in cold. We profited for that moment and we ate a bit of salad (bought from “Sheriff”) because we were very hungry.

We cut in with a girl who was waiting, as us the bus. At the beginning we spoke in Russian, but after we found out she knows Romanian, we changed the language. She was born in Tiraspol, but she is studying in Chisinau.

We forgot her name, but we remember she was talkative and positive. After waiting for an hour to appear a bus to take us from there, finally, a white Mercedes minibus, with a drunk driver, came for us.

We gave him 36 lei/person, (the price for a ticket) and we were happy to know that in an hour we will be at home.

We could warm up in that minibus, although near us was sitting a drunken man who believed we were going to Balti. He was stopped at the customs and obligated to pay a mulct. It was funny, because his family didn’t stop to argue him, while he was “high”. At the customs house, we showed that part of inquest which we completed when we entered in Transnistria.

They let us go. In more than one hour we were back in Chisinau. That sensation of old soviet atmosphere continued to rout us, even if we were pretty far from that place. Transnistria seems to be a forgotten place, where the people who live there have a strange way of acting, a strange behavior-always shy, always silent, with the eyes aimed on you.”

1

At the border between Moldova and Transnistria. You can observe "PMR" name.

2

Big agglomeration at the wicket from where you must register yourself to come in Transnistria.

3

Here you are at the border and these blocks are from Tighina (Bendery in russian). Bendery is controlled by PMR.

4

This is a Transnistrian WC from the border. (Transnistrian reek)

5

Some blocks in Tiraspol

6

Other blocks

7

The same soviet style

9

A Sheriff supermarket. Sheriff (in Cyrillic: Шериф) is the second-largest company based in Transnistria.

10

Food and coffee shops

11

Old sovietic blocks

12

The railway station from Tiraspol (Bus station is in the same location).

13

A panel of arrivals and departures from the bus station

14

The map of Transnistria with all roads.

18

Transnistrian roubles

19

Our ticket from Sheriff Supermarket

20

The bus ticket for Chişinău-Tiraspol route (31.90 Moldavian Lei-2 Euro)

21

The necessary inquest for passing in Transnistria. You must pay 22 Moldavian Lei for this.

22

After that,transnistrian policeman will register you. Half from the paper you must keep it with you because you cant leave Transnistria without that paper.

15

Transnistrian auto plate with Tiraspol.

16

Other blocks in sovietic style

17

At Sheriff supermarkets they have a 7% discount for old people.

8

Sheriff supermarket outside.